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Honoring the Legacy of Chef Dr. P Soundararajan

Worldchefs is deeply saddened to hear of the sudden loss of Dr. Chef P Soundararajan. Chef Soundararajan was a visionary leader in our community and beyond, a cherished mentor, and an instrumental supporter of Worldchefs’ mission.

As an Honorary Life Member of Worldchefs and in his role as founder General Secretary of the Indian Federation of Culinary Associations, Chef Soundararajan dedicated himself to the industry. Known for his tenacity and compassion, his extraordinary contributions to the culinary profession will endure.

A native of Coimbatore, Chef Soundararajan studied mathematics and statistics at the University of Madras before pursuing a Catering and Hotel Management degree from the Institute of Hotel Management – Chennai.

Over more than four decades, Dr. Soundararajan honed his skills as a professional chef, mentor, and speaker. His career began at The Ashok, a part of the Taj Group of Hotels, where he trained under the French Chef Roger Moncourt. He was assigned to Catering for the prestigious Asian Games, cooking for close to six thousand athletes every day.

“The Prime Minister’s Chef!” was his first major success, being appointed as the “Chef” in charge at the Official State House of the Prime Minister in New Delhi. Here he prepared all the state banquets hosted by the Prime Minister and the Vice President of India, cooking for more than 40 heads of state, including Nelson Mandela, K P. Bhattarai, and Maumoon Gayoom.

Seizing an opportunity to expand his culinary skills, Soundararajan joined the Ashok Kovalam Hotel at Thiruvananthapuram and trained in Royal Cuisine from some of the best master chefs of the Travancore Kingdom. In 1984, he worked as a chef at Kanishka Hotel and gained tremendous knowledge and experience working with Chef J M. Chaudhuri.

He served as Corporate Executive Chef at Club Mahindra Holidays & Resorts, India’s leading lifetime holiday company with 50 resorts across the country, from 1997 to May of 2019.

A renowned member of the culinary community in India, Chef Soundararajan was awarded an Honorary Doctorate by Vels University, presented by the former President of India, Dr. A P J. Abdul Kalam. He was the recipient of the prestigious National Award from the Ministry of Tourism, the Golden Star Award from the South India Culinary Association, and also represented India in the Bocuse d’Or global competition.

Dr. Soundararajan received Certification in World Cuisine from the Culinary Institute of America and a fellowship from St. Nicholas University, Louisiana. Nominated to represent India as a member of Worldchefs Education Committee, he spearheaded sustainability initiatives, and lent his expertise to the first Worldchefs Global Hospitality Certification program, participating in the Worldchefs Certification Pilot Program in India. He was also a Worldchefs Certified Judge.

We thank Chef Soundararajan for a lifetime of remarkable contributions to our profession. He will be missed, and his memory will be honored by all those whose lives he has touched. His legacy continues with the next generation of industry leaders who will carry his torch forward.

We offer our deepest condolences to his family and friends.

Worldchefs President, Thomas A. Gugler, shares a message of farewell after the passing of Dr. Chef P Soundararajan:


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Summer Served Chilled, Shaken & Stirred

Dilmah Elixir of Ceylon Tea is a natural tea extract designed to make hot summer days, chilled out. In under 2 minutes, make beverages that are low in sugar, ranging from iced teas, mocktails, cocktails, shakes and smoothies. Test its convenience and consistency with the Iced Tea Inspiration Travel Pack which features Dilmah’s Ceylon Black Tea extract with Lychee / Peach / Mango / Lemon and Lime. 

Explore recipes and more, here: www.elixirofceylontea.com.



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El Colegio Nacional de Chefs Profesionales de México A.C. joins Worldchefs as National Member

El Colegio Nacional de Chefs Profesionales de México A.C. joins Worldchefs as National Member

  • El Colegio Nacional de Chefs Profesionales de México A.C. has joined as a Worldchefs National Member.
  • Founded in 2018, El Colegio Nacional de Chefs Profesionales de México A.C. is the largest network of professionals in the food and beverage industry in Mexico, with diverse programs to support the growth of cooks and chefs at all stages of their professional development.
  • For the latest news from Mexico, follow El Colegio Nacional de Chefs Profesionales de México A.C. on Worldchefs online community platform and visit the association’s website.

Paris, 5 of June 2021 – El Colegio Nacional de Chefs Profesionales de México A.C. has joined as a Worldchefs National Member. Founded in 2018, El Colegio Nacional de Chefs Profesionales de México A.C. represents the largest network of professionals in the food and beverage industry in Mexico, with diverse programs to support the growth of cooks and chefs at all stages of their professional development.

In 2006, a small group of passionate chefs recognized the lack of a Mexican association needed to unite and represent workers in the food and beverage industry. In addition, there was an urgent need to expand and promote the ideals and high standards of Mexican gastronomy in other parts of the world. With the encouragement of the Worldchefs Board of Directors, the establishment of the association began in 2018, and on April 16, 2019, El Colegio Nacional de Chefs Profesionales de México A.C. was officially registered.

We are proud to welcome Mexico to the Worldchefs global family,” says Thomas Gugler, Worldchefs President. “Their commitment towards the culinary community and to the advancement of knowledge, exchange, and experience is an inspiration for all the culinarians around the globe.. We look forward to working together on our shared mission to build strong professional bonds with colleagues and chefs all around the world.”

El Colegio Nacional de Chefs Profesionales de México A.C. shares a core mission to advance the food and beverage industry to a level of excellence through the union and representation of gastronomy professionals in Mexico and around the globe. Their main objectives center around education, dialogue, and global connection.

El Colegio Nacional de Chefs Profesionales de México A.C. works to enrich the cultural wealth of Mexico through its gastronomy. A fundamental part of their mission is to promote and protect the vast heritage cuisine and foodways of Mexico. Through this, the association aims to foster understanding and respect, with professionalism and responsibility as core tenets for Mexican chefs around the world.

Photo: El Colegio Nacional de Chefs Profesionales de México A.C.

The young association has also nurtured a highly ranked national culinary team. Since 2012, the Mexico Culinary Team has competed for their country in some of the biggest competitions in the world, including IKA Culinary Olympics, and the Culinary World Cup and the Global Chefs Challenge. Mexico is ranked among the top 20 teams in the world in multiple categories, including Hot Kitchen, Pastry Arts and Banquets. One of the team members, Chef José Carlos Pérez Lecona, is ranked among the Top 5 in the world in the Mukimono specialty of carving, with 9 gold medals to date in Germany, Italy, and Luxembourg.

“I send greetings from all the chefs who are part of our association. We will continue working to ensure that more people in Mexico and around the world know the values and initiatives of Worldchefs,” says Rodrigo Ibañez, President of  El Colegio Nacional de Chefs Profesionales de México A.C.

For the latest news from Mexico, follow El Colegio Nacional de Chefs Profesionales de México A.C. on Worldchefs online community platform and visit the association’s website.

To connect with members of El Colegio Nacional de Chefs Profesionales de México A.C. as well as other national associations, leading companies, and hospitality professionals around the globe, create a free Worldchefs account within seconds at www.worldchefs.org/login.

Feature image: Mexico’s Junior National Team at the IKA/Culinary Olympics award ceremony. Photo: Worldchefs

-END-

ABOUT WORLDCHEFS 

The World Association of Chefs’ Societies, known as Worldchefs, is a dynamic global network of 110 chef associations worldwide. A leading voice in the hospitality industry, Worldchefs carries 91 years of history since its founding at the Sorbonne by the venerable Auguste Escoffier. Representing a mobilized international membership of culinary professionals, Worldchefs is committed to advancing the profession and leveraging the influence of the chef jacket for the betterment of the industry and humanity at large.

Worldchefs is dedicated to raising culinary standards and social awareness through these core focus areas:

Education – Worldchefs offers support for education and professional development through the landmark Worldchefs Academy online training program, a diverse network of Worldchefs Education Partners and curriculums, and the world’s first Global Hospitality Certification recognizing on-the-job skills in hospitality; 

Networking – Worldchefs connects culinary professionals around the world through their online community platform and provides a gateway for industry networking opportunities through endorsed events and the biennial Worldchefs Congress & Expo;

Competition – Worldchefs sets global standards for competition rules, provides Competition Seminars and assurance of Worldchefs Certified Judges, and operates the prestigious Global Chefs Challenge;

Humanitarianism & Sustainability – Worldchefs Feed the Planet and World Chefs Without Borders programs relieve food poverty, deliver crisis support, and promote sustainability across the globe.

For more information about Worldchefs, visit us at www.worldchefs.org.

ABOUT EL COLEGIO NACIONAL DE CHEFS PROFESIONALES DE MÉXICO A.C.

Founded in 2018, El Colegio Nacional de Chefs Profesionales de México A.C. works to unite the gastronomy professionals of Mexico at all levels of their careers who are in search of professional improvement, promoting specialization and international certification, participating and organizing conferences, seminars and world-class competitions, publicizing the heritage and wealth of the national gastronomy.

As part of this mission, the association’s key objectives are to:

GROUP the graduates in gastronomy, chefs, students and the like from Mexico to fight for their professional improvement.
ESTABLISH and foster fraternal relations with other professional associations, especially with those of similar or related professionals in the country.

MONITOR the professional exercise of the Food and Beverage industry, in order that it be carried out within the highest moral and legal plane.

PROMOTE the issuance and reform of Laws and Regulations relating to the exercise of Gastronomy, Service and Sommelier.

PROMOTE the general culture, specialization and international certification of the members, as well as the dissemination of Mexican Gastronomy in the world.

PARTICIPATE and organize congresses, forums, panels, seminars, courses, diplomas, certifications, etc., and culinary competitions.

For more information, visit colegionacionaldechefs.com.mx.

For any media inquiries, contact: 

Clare Pettersson

Communications Manager, Worldchefs

marketing@Worldchefs.org


El Colegio Nacional de Chefs Profesionales de México A.C. se une a Worldchefs como Miembro Nacional

  • El Colegio Nacional de Chefs Profesionales de México A.C. se ha unido a Worldchefs como Miembro Nacional.
  • Fundado en 2018, el Colegio Nacional de Chefs Profesionales de México A.C. es la asiciación de profesionales de la indistria de Alimentos y Bebidas mas grande de México, con diversos programas que propician el crecimiento de chefs y cocineros en cualquier etapa de su desarrollo profesional.
  • Sigue al  Colegio Nacional de Chefs Profesionales de México A.C. para enterarte de las últimas noticias en la plataforma en línea de la comunidad Worldchefs y visita el sitio web de la asociacón website.

París, 5 de junio de 2021 – El Colegio Nacional de Chefs Profesionales de México A.C. se ha incorporado como Miembro Nacional de Worldchefs. Fundado en 2018, el Colegio Nacional de Chefs Profesionales de México A.C. representa la red de profesionales más grande de la industria de alimentos y bebidas en México, con diversos programas para apoyar el crecimiento de cocineros y chefs en todas las etapas de su desarrollo profesional.

En 2006, un pequeño grupo de chefs apasionados detectó la falta de una asociación mexicana necesaria para unir y representar a los trabajadores de la industria de alimentos y bebidas. Además, existía una urgente necesidad de expandir y promover los ideales y altos estándares de la gastronomía mexicana en otras partes del mundo. Con el apoyo de la Junta Directiva de Worldchefs, el establecimiento de la asociación comenzó en 2018, y el 16 de abril de 2019 se registró oficialmente El Colegio Nacional de Chefs Profesionales de México A.C.

“Estamos orgullosos de darle la bienvenida a México a la familia global de Worldchefs”, dijo Thomas Gugler, presidente de Worldchefs. “Su compromiso con la comunidad culinaria y con el avance del conocimiento, el intercambio y la experiencia es una inspiración para todos los apasionados de la gastronomía y la hospitalidas de todo el mundo. Esperamos trabajar juntos en nuestra misión compartida de construir fuertes lazos profesionales con colegas y chefs. alrededor del mundo.”

El Colegio Nacional de Chefs Profesionales de México A.C. comparte la misión principal de hacer avanzar la industria de alimentos y bebidas a un nivel de excelencia a través de la unión y representación de profesionales de la gastronomía en México y en todo el mundo. Sus principales objetivos se centran en la educación, el diálogo y la conexión global.

El Colegio Nacional de Chefs Profesionales de México A.C. trabaja para enriquecer la riqueza cultural de México a través de su gastronomía. Una parte fundamental de su misión es promover y proteger la vasta herencia culinaria y gastronómica de México. A través de esto, la asociación tiene como objetivo fomentar la comprensión y el respeto, con el profesionalismo y la responsabilidad como principios fundamentales para los chefs mexicanos de todo el mundo.

Foto: El Colegio Nacional de Chefs Profesionales de México A.C.

La joven asociación también ha nutrido un equipo culinario nacional de alto rango. Desde 2012, el Equipo Culinario de México ha competido por su país en algunas de las competencias más importantes del mundo, incluidas las Olimpiadas Culinarias IKA, la Copa Mundial de la Gastronomía y el Desafío Global de Chefs. México está clasificado entre los 20 mejores equipos del mundo en diferentes categorías, que incluyen Cocina Caliente, Pastelería y Banquetes. Uno de los miembros del equipo, el Chef José Carlos Pérez Lecona, está clasificado entre los 5 mejores del mundo en la especialidad de tallado de Mukimono, con 9 medallas de oro hasta la fecha en Alemania, Italia y Luxemburgo.

“Envío los saludos de todos los chefs que formamos parte de nuestra asociación. Continuaremos trabajando para que más personas en México y en todo el mundo, conozcan los valores e iniciativas de Worldchefs”, dice Rodrigo Ibáñez, presidente del Colegio Nacional de Chefs Profesionales de México A.C.

Para las últimas noticias de México, sigue al  Colegio Nacional de Chefs Profesionales de México A.C. en la plataforma en línea de la comunidad Worldchefs y visita el sitio web de la asociacón website.

Para conectarse con miembros de El Colegio Nacional de Chefs Profesionales de México A.C., así como con otras asociaciones nacionales, empresas líderes y profesionales de la industria de la hospitalidad de todo el mundo, cree una cuenta gratuita de Worldchefs en segundos en www.worldchefs.org/login.

Foto principal: Equipo Nacional Junior en las Olimpiadas Culinarias IKA, durante la ceremonia de premiación. Foto: Worldchefs

-FINAL-

ACERCA DE WORLDCHEFS

La Asociación Mundial de Sociedades de Chefs, conocida como Worldchefs, es una red global dinámica de 110 asociaciones de chefs en todo el mundo. Una voz líder en la industria hotelera, Worldchefs lleva 91 años de historia desde su fundación en la Sorbona por el venerable Auguste Escoffier. Representando una membresía internacional movilizada de profesionales culinarios, Worldchefs se compromete a promover la profesión y aprovechar la influencia del uniforme del chef para el mejoramiento de la industria y la humanidad en general.

Worldchefs se dedica a elevar los estándares culinarios y la conciencia social a través de estas áreas de enfoque centrales:

Educación: Worldchefs ofrece apoyo para la educación y el desarrollo profesional a través del emblemático programa de capacitación en línea de la Academia Worldchefs, una red diversa de socios educativos y planes de estudio de Worldchefs, y la primera certificación mundial en hotelería que reconoce las habilidades en el trabajo en hotelería;

Networking: Worldchefs conecta a los profesionales culinarios de todo el mundo a través de su plataforma de comunidad en línea y proporciona una puerta de entrada a las oportunidades de trabajo en red de la industria a través de eventos patrocinados y el evento bienal Worldchefs Congress & Expo;

Competencia: Worldchefs establece estándares globales para las reglas de competencia, brinda seminarios de competencia y garantía de jueces certificados por Worldchefs, y opera el prestigioso Global Chefs Challenge;

Humanitarismo y sostenibilidad: los programas Worldchefs Feed the Planet (Alimentando el Planerta) y World Chefs Without Borders (Chefs sin Fronteras) alivian la pobreza alimentaria, brindan apoyo en caso de crisis y promueven la sostenibilidad en todo el mundo.

Para obtener más información sobre Worldchefs, visítenos en www.worldchefs.org.

ACERCA DE EL COLEGIO NACIONAL DE CHEFS PROFESIONALES DE MÉXICO A.C.

Fundado en 2018, El Colegio Nacional de Chefs Profesionales de México AC trabaja para unir a los profesionales de la gastronomía de México en cualquier nivel de sus carreras y que están en busca de superación profesional, promoviendo la especialización y certificación internacional, participando y organizando congresos, seminarios y competencias de clase mundial, dando a conocer el patrimonio y la riqueza de la gastronomía nacional.

Como parte de esta misión, los objetivos clave de la asociación son:

AGRUPAR a los graduados en gastronomía, cocineros, estudiantes y afines de México para luchar por su superación profesional.

ESTABLECER y fomentar relaciones fraternales con otras asociaciones profesionales, especialmente con las de profesionales similares o afines del país.

MONITOREAR el ejercicio profesional de la industria de Alimentos y Bebidas, con el fin de que se lleve a cabo dentro del más alto plano moral y legal.

PROMOVER la emisión y reforma de Leyes y Reglamentos relativos al ejercicio de la Gastronomía, Servicio y Sommelier.

PROMOVER la cultura general, especialización y certificación internacional de los miembros, así como la difusión de la Gastronomía Mexicana en el mundo.

PARTICIPA y organiza congresos, foros, paneles, seminarios, cursos, diplomas, certificaciones, y ccompetencias  gastronómicas.

Para obtener más información, visite www.colegionacionaldechefs.com.mx.

Para cualquier consulta de los medios, comuníquese con:

Clare Pettersson

Gerente de comunicaciones, Worldchefs

marketing@Worldchefs.org


 

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Is Multi-Sensory Experience the Future of Fine Dining?

Is Multi-Sensory Experience the Future of Fine Dining?

Cocoon-like dining spaces, mood-altering lights, fragrances paired with food — the haute end of the restaurant chain is simmering with multi-sensory intrigue. Le Cordon Bleu contributing editor Sona Bahadur explores the growing popularity of immersive gastronomic experiences that stimulate not just taste buds but all of the senses to heighten the pleasure of eating.

Can a lollipop evoke the same feelings as listening to Tchaikovsky’s 1812 overture? Can an edible version of a Jackson Pollock painting be created on the dining table? Can a loaf of heritage wheat bread bring alive the last supper prepared in Pompeii moments before Mt Vesuvius erupted and reduced the ancient Roman city to ashes? If you’re a multi-sensory cuisine enthusiast, you’ll know that the answers are yes, yes and yes!

The said Tchaikovsky lollipop made its appearance at a 2016 International Society of Neuro-gastronomy meeting; the heritage bread was recreated by British culinary wizard Heston Blumenthal as part of a meal inspired by the cuisine of Pompeii last year, and the Jackson Pollock-inspired dessert is just one among many of Grant Achatz’s genre-bending dishes for his Chicago-based restaurant Alinea.

Only a decade ago, such high-concept experiences would have been dismissed as flights of fancy. Worse, they would have elicited derision. A good meal should speak for itself, traditionalists would have scorned. Yet what was once just the simple pleasure of eating is increasingly becoming a curated, playful, often tech-aided spectacle that takes dining to new levels of enjoyment.

Sense and satiety:

Although the act of eating is multi-sensory by its very nature, the notion that enjoying food and drink transcends taste and involves all of the five senses began finding wider acceptance during the 2010s. An increasing number of high-end restaurants are experimenting with smells, sounds, storytelling and other “off-the-plate” elements to manipulate the perception of flavour. From dining in the dark to 12-course culinary operas, from musical food pairings to high-tech “taste pods” that enhance the taste of chocolates, sense-stimulating experiences are all the rage.

Multi-Sensory Fine Dining Experience

The science of flavour perception:

The popularity of multi-sensory dining owes in large part to the emergence of the science of neuro-gastronomy, which has helped unravel the complex multi-sensory brain processes that create the range of flavours we experience when eating and drinking. According to neuro-scientist Gordon M. Shepherd, our appreciation of what is in the mouth is created by the brain. Charles Spence, Professor of Experimental Psychology at the University of Oxford and author of Gastrophysics: The New Science of Eating, postulates a similar view. “I think we all assume that taste comes from our tongues….In fact, all of your senses are involved. Everything from the colour of the plate to the weight of the cutlery in your hands, from the background music to any ambient scent, as well as the lighting and even the softness of the chair you are sitting on.”

All the food world’s a stage:

What started in the lab segued into the kitchen. Blumenthal was at the vanguard of experiential dining. His Sound of the Sea, a plate of oysters, clams, seaweed and panko “sand,” which comes with an iPod tucked into a conch shell at the Fat Duck, is now regarded as a classic of multi-sensory dining. The iPod plays sounds of the ocean, waves crashing and children playing to conjure up feelings of nostalgia. Ferran Adria and Grant Achatz, who began serving menus that stimulate the senses a decade ago, have been equally influential. As the trend finds fans across the globe, more examples have emerged — Schloss Schauenstein in Switzerland, Ultraviolet in China, El Celler de Can Roca in Spain, and more.

The appeal of immersive cuisine:

Modern chefs are recognising that flavour is more potent than taste as it engages all the senses and can evoke nostalgia, reminiscence and emotion. Using audio and other sensory influences enables them to enhance the flavours of their dishes and make them more memorable. Curious, up-for-anything diners are just as hungry for enhanced dining experiences that play on all of their senses. What’s more, they are willing to pay a pretty penny for them. Witness the popularity of Ibiza’s Sublimotion, billed the world’s most expensive restaurant, where Michelin-starred chef Paco Roncero takes diners on a multi-sensory culinary voyage by fusing art, gastronomy and virtual reality. The phantasmagoric adventure comes at a price — a whopping $2,000 per meal.

A taste of the future:

The exorbitant price points of dining at multi-sensory restaurants put them beyond the reach of most diners, thereby limiting their appeal to a tiny but influential niche. Spending five hours eating a 17-course meal might not be everybody’s cup of tea. Yet there is no denying that theatrical, forward-thinking restaurants are here to stay. Neuro-gastronomy is still in its nascence and brings a lot to the table. As the field evolves and new studies emerge, practitioners of multi-sensory cuisine will take vastly different approaches to dining to accentuate their distinctiveness. Advances in technology coupled with an increasingly multidisciplinary approach to dining — think storytelling, augmented reality, virtual reality, robotics, opera, electronica, poetry, olfaction, performing arts, singing, painting, cinema, music — will continue to push the boundaries of the culinary arts.

Meanwhile, one can’t help but wonder what they will do to a lollipop next.


This article was originally published by Worldchefs Education Partner Le Cordon Bleu.

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Finnish Chefs Association Celebrates Ulla Liukkonen’s Worldchefs Honorary Life Membership Award

Chef Ulla Liukkonen was invited to become an honorary member of the World Association of Chefs’ Societies – the award was handed over on June 9, 2021 in Lahti 

Ulla Liukkonen, President of the Finnish Chefs’ Association, has been awarded an honorary membership in the World Association of Chefs Societies (Worldchefs). Liukkonen has been the chairman of the Finnish Chefs since 2008. Lifetime Honorary Membership of Worldchefs is the highest recognition a chef can receive from his colleagues.

Ulla Liukkonen, President of the Finnish Chefs’ Association. 
PHOTO: Riikka Mantila

– I am extremely grateful for the recognition I have received and I want to share it with our entire association. I warmly thank Wordchefs, the board of the Finnish Chefs Association, the member associations and all our members, as well as our supporters, for their cooperation over the years to promote Finnish food culture,” says Liukkonen.

– Recognition is granted on the basis of strict selection criteria, such as the member states’ support for the applicant and meritorious work for the country’s chefs’ association and Worldchefs, says Petri Selander, vice-president of the Finnish Chefs’ Association.

Osmo Norha (1974) and Martti Lehtinen (2006) have previously been invited from Finland to become honorary members of Worldchefs.

The recognition was announced at the Worldchef Congress on 15 August 2020, which was held as a remote congress instead of the Worldchefs Congress & Expo in St. Petersburg due to the corona situation.

Due to the situation, the harnesses were handed over to Liukkonen less than a year late. A solemn handover ceremony was held on June 9, 2021 in Lahti in connection with the board meeting of the Finnish Chefs’ Association. In addition to SKM’s board, representatives of the regional association Päijät-Hämeen Keittiömestarit ry congratulated them.

The Finnish Chefs Association congratulates Liuko on the recognition.

PHOTO: Riikka Mantila

 

About Suomen Keittiömestarit (the Finnish Chefs’ Assocation)

The Finnish Chefs’ Association is a national association that acts as the central organization of regional chefs’ associations and as the guardian of the professional interests of its members, promotes professional skills and knowledge, and co-operates between communities, companies and individuals operating in the field. One of the main goals of the activity is to promote Finnish food culture and high-quality cooking skills. The association also supports competition activities in the field. The Finnish Chefs’ Association is a member association of the Nordic and world chef associations. Learn more at www.chefs.fi.

About Worldchefs

The World Association of Chefs’ Societies, known as Worldchefs, is a dynamic global network of 110 chef associations worldwide. A leading voice in the hospitality industry, Worldchefs carries 91 years of history since its founding at the Sorbonne by the venerable Auguste Escoffier. Representing a mobilized international membership of culinary professionals, Worldchefs is committed to advancing the profession and leveraging the influence of the chef jacket for the betterment of the industry and humanity at large.

Worldchefs is dedicated to raising culinary standards and social awareness through these core focus areas:

Education – Worldchefs offers support for education and professional development through the landmark Worldchefs Academy online training program, a diverse network of Worldchefs Education Partners and curriculums, and the world’s first Global Hospitality Certification recognizing on-the-job skills in hospitality; 

Networking – Worldchefs connects culinary professionals around the world through their online community platform and provides a gateway for industry networking opportunities through endorsed events and the biennial Worldchefs Congress & Expo;

Competition – Worldchefs sets global standards for competition rules, provides Competition Seminars and assurance of Worldchefs Certified Judges, and operates the prestigious Global Chefs Challenge;

Humanitarianism & Sustainability – Worldchefs Feed the Planet and World Chefs Without Borders programs relieve food poverty, deliver crisis support, and promote sustainability across the globe.

For more information about Worldchefs, visit us at www.worldchefs.org.

Keittiömestari Ulla Liukkonen kutsuttiin kokkien maailmanliiton kunniajäseneksi – käädyt luovutettin 9.6.2021 Lahdessa

Suomen Keittiömestarit ry:n puheenjohtaja, keittiömestari Ulla Liukkoselle on myönnetty maailman keittiömestariliiton The World Association of Chefs Societies -yhdistyksen (Worldchefs) kunniajäsenyys. Liukkonen on toiminut Suomen Keittiömestareiden puheenjohtajana vuodesta 2008 alkaen. Maailmanliiton elinikäinen kunniajäsenyys on korkein huomionosoitus, minkä keittiömestari voi saada kollegoiltaan.

– Olen äärettömän kiitollinen saamastani tunnustuksesta ja haluan jakaa sen koko yhdistyksemme kanssa. Kiitän lämpimästi Wordchefsia, Suomen Keittiömestarit ry:n hallitusta, jäsenyhdistyksiä ja kaikkia jäseniämme sekä tukijoitamme vuosien aikana tehdystä yhteistyöstä suomalaisen ruokakulttuurin edistämiseksi”, kiittää Liukkonen.

– Tunnustus myönnetään tiukkojen valintakriteerien pohjalta, joita ovat esimerkiksi jäsenmaiden tuki hakijalle sekä ansiokas toiminta oman maan keittiömestariliiton sekä Worldchefsien hyväksi, kertoo Suomen Keittiömestarit ry:n varapuheenjohtaja Petri Selander.

Suomesta maailmanliiton kunniajäseniksi on kutsuttu aiemmin Osmo Norha (1974) ja Martti Lehtinen (2006).

Tunnustus julkistettiin 15.8.2020 pidetyssä maailmanliiton kongressissa, joka järjestettiin koronatilanteen vuoksi etäkongressina Pietariin suunnitellun Worldchefs Congress & Expo -tilaisuuden sijasta.

Tilanteesta johtuen käädyt päästiin luovuttamaan Liukkoselle vajaan vuoden myöhässä. Juhlava luovutustilaisuus pidettiin 9.6.2021 Lahdessa Suomen Keittiömestarit ry:n hallituksen kokouksen yhteydessä. Paikalla onnittelemassa olivat SKM:n hallituksen lisäksi alueyhdistys Päijät-Hämeen Keittiömestarit ry:n edustajat.

Suomen Keittiömestarit ry onnittelee Liukkosta saadusta tunnustuksesta.

Suomen Keittiömestarit ry on valtakunnallinen yhdistys, joka toimii alueellisten keittiömestariyhdistysten keskusjärjestönä sekä jäsenistönsä ammatillisten etujen valvojana, ammattitaidon ja -tiedon edistäjänä sekä tekee yhteistyötä alalla toimivien yhteisöjen, yritysten ja yksityisten kesken. Yksi toiminnan keskeisimmistä tavoitteista on edistää suomalaista ruokakulttuuria ja korkealaatuista keittotaitoa. Yhdistys tukee lisäksi alan kilpailutoimintaa. Suomen Keittiömestarit ry on Pohjoismaiden ja maailman keittiömestariliittojen jäsenyhdistys.
www.chefs.fi

The World Association of Chefs Societies -yhdistyksen (Worldchefs) on keittiömestariyhdistysten maailmanlaajuinen verkosto, joka on perustettu 1928. Yhdistyksen jäseninä ovat yli 90 maan kansalliset keittiömestariliitot, jotka edustavat yhteensä yli 10 miljoonaa ammattilaista ympäri maailmaa.
www.wacs.org

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Meet The American Culinary Federation President-Elect

Meet The American Culinary Federation President-Elect

*Originally published on We Are Chefs

The American Culinary Federation announced the election of Chef Kimberly Brock Brown, CEPC, CCA, AAC, as president, among other board positions, during an annual meeting on May 12. Chef Brock Brown will be inducted during the ACF National Convention in Orlando on August 5 and serve a two-year term. 

Chef Jeff Bacon, CEC, CCA, AAC, was elected National Secretary. A run-off election, held between May 19 and June 2 for Chef-Candidates David Ivey-Soto, CEC, CCA, and Kyle Richardson, CEC, CCA, AAC, will decide the National Treasurer. In addition, ACF announced the following regional vice presidents: 

  • Central Region Vice President: Rajeev Patgaonkar, CEC, AAC
  • Northeast Region Vice President: Barry Young, CEC, CCE, AAC
  • Southeast Region Vice President: Bryan Frick, CEC, AAC
  • Western Region Vice President: Greg Matchett, CEC

Remaining on the board for a two-year term are Chef Thomas Macrina, CEC, CCA, AAC, past president, and Chef Americo DiFronzo, CEC, CCA, AAC, American Academy of Chefs Chair.

Chef Brock Brown, who is currently serving her second two-year term as Southeast Region Vice President and who has previously served 2 terms as president of her local Charleston chapter, as well as 2 terms on the ACF ethics committee, said she decided to run for president because “I wanted women to have a voice and position of leadership in the organization. I have always preached to others that when opportunities present themselves, you should take them; now I felt it was my duty to practice what I was preaching.” 

Chef Brock Brown plans to focus, first, on membership engagement, both at the student level and the professional level. She also hopes to encourage more women and chefs of color to be active and represented in ACF activities and leadership roles. 

“We can and should be a diverse, 21st Century federation,” she says. “My work will focus on ways to train and mentor students, recent graduates and up-and-coming professionals. We should be grooming the younger generation to make sure their voices are heard.” 

Chef Brock Brown also hopes to encourage others to run for the board and take up other leadership opportunities within ACF. “It would be great to have more seminars geared toward leadership, or information about next steps, especially for mid-career chefs,” she says. 

As vice president, Chef Brock Brown focused heavily on enhancing communication between the board and membership. Soon after beginning her first term in 2017 she was the first to host a monthly conference call with regional members in order to keep them informed about ACF news, changes and happenings at the national and regional levels. That call became so popular that many members outside of the Southeast region would join in—including from New Orleans and Ohio chapters. “It has always been a great way to be able to talk, ask questions and exchange ideas with each other, and it was especially helpful last year when we couldn’t get together in person at all.” For many, Chef Brock Brown’s conference call has become a networking tool, not to mention an almost therapeutic outlet for members during tough, isolating times. 

As president, Chef Brock Brown hopes to continue her commitment to transparency and communication in order to drive member engagement. In addition, she hopes to find ways to drive resources—financially and otherwise—for members, especially those hit hard by the pandemic. 

“I’m one of the many chefs who got furloughed during the pandemic,” says Brock Brown. “So many have lost and are still losing incomes, jobs and careers, so I believe we need to be in a better position to be of help and to advocate for each other. Charity should and does begin at home.” 

Born in Chicago and raised in the Western suburb of Maywood, Chef Brock Brown has had interest in food and cooking since a young child. As an adult, she fled to warmer climates, beginning in Dallas and settling down in Charleston, South Carolina. Currently, Chef Brown runs her own business as owner and corporate chef of Culinary Concepts, LLC, offering catering, personal chef and consulting services. 

Her ACF membership began in 1981 while completing an ACF apprenticeship program at El Centro College in Dallas. She went on to work as an assistant pastry chef in Atlanta, and as an executive chef(Sweet & Savory) in healthcare and corporate settings in Asheville, North Carolina and in her current hometown. She has served as an adjunct baking and pastry teacher at Trident Technical College and Johnson & Wales University, both in Charleston.  Chef Kimberly has also served as co-owner and corporate chef for a specialty foods distributor in North Charleston. 

Chef Brock Brown has participated in a variety of competitions, including the Gulf of Mexico Seafood Challenge in the 90s and she served as a member of Team South Carolina in the Culinary Super Challenge (both ACF sanctioned events) in the years 2002 to 2004. She has also traveled internationally to serve as a judge and demonstrator at competitions in Serbia, South Africa and Turkey in the years between 2013 and 2015. 

Chef Brock Brown was instrumental in the development of ACF’s Certified Culinary Administrator certification, as well as becoming one of the first to earn that designation. She has received multiple awards, including an ACF Cutting Edge award in 2015, an AAC service award in 2016, and the ACF National President’s Medallion in 2019. She was inducted into the Hall of Fame at Dallas College – El Centro Campus in 2015. 

Chef Brock Brown is a self-published author of “Here I Am!: Chef Kimberly’s Answer to the Question ‘Where are the Female and Minority Chefs,’” and she has contributed to other books, including training manuals; “Real Women, Real Leaders: Surviving and Succeeding in the Business World” and ” Toques in Black: A Celebration of Black Chefs.” 

She also spent two years as guest chef on WCSC (NBC-5) television’s “Coffee With” cooking segment and eight years as a guest chef on Charleston’s WCIV (ABC) TV “Lowcountry Live” talk show.

To learn more about the ACF president-elect, visit kimberlybrockbrown.com.

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How to Keep Up with the Next Generation of Food Tourism

Gastronomic tourism predictions & preparation, post-COVID

Let us take you back to a time where tourists could wander off the beaten path and onto the rugged cobblestones of a road-less-travelled neighbourhood, exploring the bustling local markets through a delight of aromas and friendly unfamiliar faces during an authentic food and walking tour. Tasting sauces with strangers, breaking bread with locals and learning about cultures through the eyes (and tastebuds) of travelling gastronomes.

Now fast-forward to our current times of the pandemic, where the only thing we are breaking with strangers are personal boundaries and the foodies with wanderlust are now craving a cooking and cultural experience to be satisfied through digital means. It is no secret that the travel industry and its bread and butter, culinary tourism, has been greatly impacted by the extreme decline in international travel and shift in demand. As COVID-19 has transformed the gastronomic tourism industry globally, businesses are either pivoting, looking to pivot, or launching new offerings; and technology is featuring across these changes in different ways. From adapting food tourism experiences in line social distancing requirements to the anticipation of government support, there are a few ways the culinary tourism market can sow seeds in the consumer landscape of the future.

From the inside, out

As the cultural trend for destination brand identity is re-evaluated by businesses internationally, it is important for stakeholders in the gastronomic tourism industry to address technological transformation as a key pillar and extend their existing models to reflect this shift. New research shows that the impact of moving food tourism to digital space also calls for us to examine the current situation and explore research and practical consequences in the post-COVID future. As tourism has proven to be resilient through past events, it is predicted this is a key reflection of the future and there is also anticipation for government support to the sector; assisting in the rebuild and aligned with technology’s new role in the industry.

 


Navigating the change in direction

As we overcome the current and future restrictions through technology, there is a new spotlight on domestic tourism as a buffer against the fall in international culinary travel. Due to the limitations on travel, it is important for the gastronomic tourism industry to explore new domestic opportunities in line with social distancing requirements, safety and hygiene protocols, local access and adapting to social capacities to appeal to the responsible consumer behaviour. Domestic demand is rebounding faster than international demand and businesses are providing gastronomes with fulfillment through local food tourism, right in our own backyards. By offering a more local experience and targeted approach in line with the neighbouring market, it is building the foundation of a new pillar in offerings now and into the future.

Technology: The passport of today

With gastronomic tourism facing the challenge of remaining attractive to current and potential customers, technology is also providing opportunities in areas which address the need for tourists to access cultural information and create new home-based experiences. The pandemic has flourished the growth of innovative concepts in technology relating to culinary travel. Online cooking sessions and tutorials, live guided tastings, virtual reality tours, remote social eating and drinking are current and viable applications that have succeeded in supporting and temporarily replacing the traditional gastronomy tourism experience. Travelling Spoon is the perfect example of a food business who have pivoted successfully using technology, with a shift from primarily international experiences to now offer cooking classes with locals both in-person and online. The use of creativity with technology combined will allow businesses within the food tourism industry to continue appealing to gastronomes and keep the travelling flame alight, satisfying the current and evolving demands.

In conclusion

For food tourism, the limitations faced during the pandemic has been a journey of adaption and exploration of new opportunities in technology. From stakeholders addressing new strategies in line with tech to including offerings which appeal to the local market, these key methods of preparation are proving to be the most effective way forward. As we research and prepare for what the industry will look like post-COVID, it is more important now than ever to understand the history and future of gastronomic tourism to grow with the demand and stamp your potential on the technology passport of global food travel’s future.

Le Cordon Bleu Online Learning

This article was originally published by Worldchefs Education Partner Le Cordon Bleu.

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The frying oil showdown: Which is the best option?

Don’t we just love deep-fried foods? We can hardly resist the distinct aromas, flavors, and mouthfeel of deep-fried foods, luring us with their golden color and crispy texture. Just envisioning a crispy fried chicken or a fried mantou bread can make your mouth water. But did you know that the frying oil used to fry these foods play a significant role in producing the desired end results? In this article, between soybean, sunflower, and palm oil, let’s find out which of these is the best for deep-frying.

What happens during deep-frying?

Deep-frying is often described as heating of food at 150 – 190oC in an oil immersion.  During deep-frying, the frying oils undergo physical and chemical changes due to the presence of oxygen and moisture. Reactions such as hydrolysis, oxidation, ring formation and polymerization take place during deep-frying1. As a result of these reactions, the degradation of the frying oil takes place. The degradation of the oil hinges on its fatty acid composition. As shown in Figure 1, the stability of the oils that contain higher amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids such as soybean and sunflower oil, degrade faster than palm oil. While palm oil contains only 10% polyunsaturated fatty acids, soybean and sunflower contains 61% and 62% respectively2. Unlike polyunsaturated oils, palm oil contains less linolenic acid which is highly susceptible to oxidation during frying. For polyunsaturated oils to be used for deep frying, these oils need to undergo partial hydrogenation to increase the oils’ stability, which is unfortunately harmful as it causes the formation of trans fatty acids. Today, oils with lower stability such as sunflower and soybean are commonly blended with palm oil to gain higher melting point for better frying application.

“Unlike polyunsaturated oils, palm oil contains less linolenic acid which is highly susceptible to oxidation during frying.”

Figure 1: Stability of oil against fatty acid composition

Repeated frying is safe

Yes it is – to a certain level. Many households and industrial kitchens are accustomed to repeated frying to ensure cost effectiveness3. After one frying session, sometimes the oil we use is too ‘fresh’ to be wasted away. However, reheating vegetable oil at a high temperature leads to the production of rancid odor and flavor due to oxidation. Hydroperoxides and aldehydes are formed and are absorbed by food and eventually enter our system after ingestion.  These have been indicated as potentially harmful components in our diets.

According to the American Oil Chemists’ Society (AOCS)4, the maximum allowable peroxide value for edible oils is 10 meq/kg oil. A study5 (Figure 2) has shown that after heating five times, the peroxide value of soybean oil, sunflower oil, and palm oil are 10.88 meq/kg oil, 8.42 meq/kg oil, and 6.01 meq/kg oil respectively. Clearly, the level of peroxide value in soybean oil exceeds the allowable value stipulated by AOCS, while the other two remains within the threshold. Higher peroxide value indicates lower chemical stability of the oil during frying. This clearly shows that palm oil is most stable among all.  As mentioned before, due to higher level of PUFA, these oils have lower stability as PUFA contain double bonds6, which are reactive in the presence of oxygen. Peroxide value indicates the presence of lipid hydroperoxides which in the body, can decompose into free radicals that can oxidize other unsaturated fatty acids and form compounds that are potentially toxic to one’s health7.

“Tocotrienols, which are abundantly found in palm oil, was found to exhibit higher antioxidant ability than tocopherol, which are found in other oils such as sunflower and soybean oil.”

Figure 2: Peroxide value (meq/kg oil) of soybean, sunflower, and palm oil after 5 frying sessions7

Fortunately, antioxidants in vegetable oil provide natural resistance to oxidation4. Palm oil, processed or unprocessed, is rich in tocopherols and tocotrienols (vitamin E). Vitamin E is an important antioxidant, which helps combat chronic disease8. The primary role of vitamin E is to prevent the oxidation of fatty acids in oils by free radicals. It is the presence of tocopherols and tocotrienols in palm oil that provide better oxidative stability during frying. Based on these observations, in this comparison, palm oil emerges as the more stable oil for deep-frying and is much safer for repeated frying with less potential to produce toxicity in humans.

References

  1. Mihal, J. (2020). Characteristics Of Palm Oil/Palm Olein As Frying Oil. Retrieved 8 April 2020, from https://www.brecorder.com/2020/01/12/561006/characteristics-of-palm-oilpalm-olein-as-frying-oil/
  2. Health & Nutrition. (2021). Retrieved 1 April 2021, from https://www.fediol.eu/web/health%20and%20nutrition/1011306087/list1187970137/f1.html
  3. Leong X.F., Ng C.Y., Jaarin K. and Mustafa M.R. (2015); Austin J Pharmacol Ther, 3(2).1068.
  4. AOCS (2003) Official methods and recommended practices of the American Oil Chemists’ Society. 4th ed. AOCS Press, Champaign, Illinois.
  5. Goswami, G., Bora, R., and Rathore, M.. (2015). International Journal of Science Technology and Management, 4(1):495-501
  6. Vieira, S.A., Zhang, G. and Decker, E.A. (2017). J Am Oil Chem Soc ; 94, 339–351
  7. McIntyre T.M. and Hazen S.L. (2010). Circ Res.; 107: 1167-1169.
  8. Dauqan, E., Halimah, and Abdullah, A. (2011). Vitamin E and Beta Carotene Composition in Four Different Vegetable Oils. American Journal of Applied Sciences. 8. 407-412. 10.3844/ajassp.2011.407.412.

Visit Malaysian Palm Oil Council’s website and follow them on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter to learn more about palm oil’s nutritional and economical advantages as well as environmental sustainability.


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Chefs’ Pledge – the results are in!

Cartoon Chefs

Chefs together, can change the world!

Earlier this year, the Chefs’ Manifesto, together with several partner networks, conducted a survey titled, ‘Chefs’ Pledge’. The intent was to learn from participants, what the top practical actions are that chefs can take to actively engage in transforming food systems, to ensure good food for all. Based on the Chefs’ Manifesto Thematic Areas, the aim was to further narrow and focus the SDG roadmap for chefs.

Drum roll please… the results are in!

The survey was conducted from late February through to May, inviting participants via social media, direct email, through our partner networks and various campaigns. 

For each of the Chefs’ Manifesto 8 Thematic Areas, participants were asked to rank in order which action, taken from the Chefs’ Manifesto Action Planwould enact the most change for food systems transformation once implemented. The following is an analysis of the results.

The results show the actions that received the highest percentage of number one ranked votes. A further, more detailed analysis of all the ranked actionable outcome will be available via PDF soon.

(Please note, any discrepancy in the percentage figures is accounted for by respondents who may have skipped a question.)

Demographics

The Chefs’ Manifesto surveyed respondents from in excess of 50 countries, with a wide variety of skills and expertise, with a common goal: to make positive transformation to our food systems and provide good food for all. Survey participants identify as being engaged as one of the following: a chef; a cook; a culinary student; other (Figure 1).

Qu 1

Figure 1

To capture the diversity of the survey participants, a geographical location was requested. Participants identified as being from 6 continents, including Africa, North America, Latin America, Asia, Australia and Europe. Over 50 countries were represented – WOW – including, but are not limited too: India, the Philippines, Ghana, Slovakia, South Africa, Colombia, China, Brazil, Mexico, Ireland Australia, Austria, New Zealand, Kenya and Switzerland.

Survey Questions

TA 1

Thematic Area 1: Ingredients grown with respect for the earth and its oceans

Action 1: Get to know your ingredients – how they are grown, reared or sourced – and how to choose ingredients with the lowest impact on the environment (38%). Action 2: Using your purchasing power by choosing producers or suppliers who work sustainably and to only buy from the sources who share your values (28%). Action 3: Lead by example and champion sustainable ingredients and producers through your menus and in your restaurants (34%). 

The data concluded that the majority of participants believe Action 1 – getting to know your ingredients – is the most important step that chefs can take, to respect the earth and its oceans and enact real change. For more inspiration visit here

Thematic Area 2: Protection of biodiversity and improving animal welfare

Action 1: Leading by example through maintaining the rich diversity of the world’s natural larder by using different varieties of plants, grains, and proteins and to champion “wild” variants and avoid monoculture (31.8%). Action 2: Leading by example through raising awareness about the importance of free-range eggs, sustainably sourced fish and animal welfare on our menus and in our restaurants (21.8%). Action 3: Use our purchasing power through choosing producers who commit to higher animal welfare standards and avoiding industrialised livestock production (19.4%). Action 4: Use purchasing power to choose only fish and seafood that is abundant and sourced sustainably (27%). 

Voted the most important action to enable the protection of biodiversity and improve animal welfare for participants, is to lead by example through maintaining the rich diversity of the world’s natural larder by using different varieties of plants, grains, and proteins and to champion “wild” variants and avoid monoculture. For more inspiration visit here.

Thematic Area 3: Investment in Livelihoods

Action 1: Get to know your ingredients: who grows, harvests, sources and packages them? Investigate the journey from farm to fork and reduce the number of the intermediaries between you and the farmer (23.4%). Action 2: Use your purchasing power to choose products that are priced fairly, to enable a viable livelihood for farmers and suppliers (13.5%). Action 3: Use your purchasing power to support more farmers to access marketplaces through choosing to buy from small-scale producers (13%). Action 4: Lead by example through paying fair wages, promoting equal opportunities and providing training within your restaurants (15.8%). Action 5: Lead by example through providing training and mentoring to help your chefs (15.8%). Action 6: Spread the word and promote the empowerment of women across the sector. They are often underserved and underrepresented and further support is required for female farmers, female producers and female chefs (18.5%). 

The data showed that the most important action for participants is to know all about the ingredients and uncover the journey from farm to fork. For more inspiration visit here.

Thematic Area 4: Value natural resources and reduce waste

Action 1: Lead by example through separating, monitoring and setting targets to reduce food waste. It is also about managing food safety processes and use by dates to avoid wastage (15%). Action 2: Lead by example through planning food orders and menus to minimise food waste through offering smaller portion sizes (11.9%). Action 3: Lead by example through using the whole ingredient and encouraging nose to tail, root to leaf eating. It is about being creative through pickling, preserving, dehydrating and freezing (11%). Action 4: Use your purchasing power to engage with suppliers and producers to help incorporate surplus produce into menus (10.6%). Action 5: Become a community food champion and re-distribute surplus food through community sharing and food bank programmes or apps (11%). Action 6: Lead by example through being resource efficient and manage water usage to cut costs and protect the environment (13%). Action 7: Lead by example through diverting waste from landfill and to investigate turning food waste into compost or bio-gas . It is about considering offsetting the carbon used in your restaurant or switching to renewable energy sources (14%). Action 8: Use your purchasing power through working with producers and suppliers to avoid excess packaging and to use recycled, recyclable and biodegradable packaging (13.5%). 

The participants have ranked the Action 1 – leading by example through separating, monitoring and setting targets to reduce food waste – as the most important. For more inspiration, visit here.

Thematic Area 5: Celebration of seasonal and local foods

Action 1: Use your purchasing power through buying locally produced foods in season and avoiding air-freighted foods (27%). Action 2: Be a community food champion – showcasing local producers and traditional techniques on your menus and restaurants (17%). Action 3: Become a community food champion through engaging with your local community and working with schools and teaching kids about nutritious food and how to cook it (17%). Action 4: Become a community food champion through becoming the connection between producers and consumers. Help to show people where their food comes from by championing farmers and connecting them to diners. Organise events to bring people – young and old – together around good food.(16%) Action 5: Become a food champion through promoting kitchen gardens and urban farming. Encourage people to start growing their own food. (24%).

Participants ranked Action 1 – to use your purchasing power through buying locally produced foods in season and avoiding air-freighted foods – as the most important action when celebrating seasonal and local foods, with a number 1 response globally of 27%. For more inspiration, visit here.

TA 6

Thematic Area 6: A focus on plant-based ingredients

Action 1: Lead by example to make vegetables, beans and pulses the centre of your dishes (32.5%). Action 2: Lead by example to use less, and better, meat (20.6%). Action 3: Lead by example to champion plant-based proteins on your menus and in your restaurants (20.6%). Be creative in describing vegetable based dishes. Action 4: Lead by example and avoid using words like “vegan” and “vegetarian” which may be off-putting (26.3%).

Action 1 – to lead by example by making vegetable, beans and pulses the centre of your dishes – was ranked the number 1 action most likely to enact change and transform food systems in focussing on plant-based ingredients. For more inspiration, visit here.

Thematic Area 7: Education on food safety & healthy diets

Action 1: Lead by example and showcase best practise on food safety, allergens and nutrition in your kitchens and through your menus. (24%) Action 2: Be a community food champion and support good nutrition education for all- young and old. Volunteer to teach a nutritious cooking class in a school, community centre or care home.(18%) Action 3: Be a community food champion: Educate diners about the importance of eating a colourful plate. (20%) Action 4: Spread the word: Use annual events like International Chefs Day (20 October), World Food Day (16 October) and local holidays to get creative and engage people in nutritious cooking. (18%) Action 5: Spread the word: Use technology as a tool for teaching others. Make videos, run web-casts and on-line campaigns. (20%).

The majority of participants responded that the highest action to enact transformation, would be leading by example and showcasing best practise on food safety, allergens and nutrition in your kitchens and through your menus. More more inspiration visit here.

Thematic Area 8: Nutritious food that is accessible & affordable for all

Action 1: Be a community food champion – support initiatives that provide access to nutritious meals in your communities – whether that be a soup kitchen, food bank or community garden project. (43%) Action 2: Be a community food champion and help raise awareness about what a nutritious meal looks like and how to cook well on a budget.(30%) Action 3: Spread the word by building a chef community across the world to share stories, best practice and learnings on how to help ensure good food is accessible and affordable for all. (18%) Action 4: Spread the word and use social media to raise awareness about food issues and how to be part of the solution. (9%)

The action that was ranked to have the highest impact is to be a community food champion – support initiatives that provide access to nutritious meals in your communities – whether that be a soup kitchen, food bank or community garden project. For more inspiration visit here.

Practical and innovative actions from participants:

At the end of the survey, participants were asked to share practical and innovative actions they are aware of, based on the above thematic areas. A summary of responses is as follows:

  • To encourage slow cooked nourishing food
  • To collect compostables from local merchants and vendors in order to reduce waste by the landfills in developing countries
  • To use a “Think Vegetables, Think Fruits” philosophy
  • To promote zero-waste kitchen concept
  • To reach more students and families and offer more virtual courses
  • To have a menu calendar and engage students in the process of harvesting, preparing, and cooking delicious and nutritious food
  • To utilise earth hour platform as an effective tool for awareness
  • To create communities with chefs to reach more people
  • To develop a solar-powered kitchen in the heart of city centres
  • To go local
  • To promote the hand-used pasta that is made by semolina and water
  • To think about furniture inside your restaurant and select eco-friendly choices
  • To have communities at grassroots level that increase the awareness on food waste
  • To lobby  lawmakers to use government programs to support regenerative food systems
  • To help people to learn how to cook on a budget
  • To be a school nutrition champion and educate students on nutritious food
  • To connect farms with schools
  • To donate thousands of rescued meals to local hunger relief programs
  • To promote meatless Mondays
  • To install bulk organic milk dispensaries
  • To offer locally grown organic produce
  • To focus more on planet-based food in schools
  • To promote the use of locally sourced seafood and beef
  • To switch from gas appliances to other electric alternatives
  • To promote gender equality when it comes to the kitchen
  • To grow your own food
  • To support farm workers
  • To be aware of how xenophobia and racism play a role in our food systems
  • To educate people about the future of food

The Chefs’ Manifesto would like to thank the following partners for making this research possible:

World Association of Chef’s SocietiesSocial Gastronomy MovementChef Ann FoundationLe Cordon Bleu LondonGood Food Fund ChinaJames Beard Foundation, and Chefs 4 the Planet.

To see more about why we conducted this research, please visit here.

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Really, is Kelp the New Kale?

Move over kale, there’s a new superfood in town. Explore the facts vs fiction to decide if kelp is the best change you’ll make for your health in 2021.

It seems like every year, there is a new ‘superfood’. Whether it is a lack of research or just clever marketing, it is difficult to truly define if the latest superfood trend is actually good for you or not. As kelp emerges from underwater forests and onto our plates, we are facing the health claims of this new nutrient-rich alternative with suspicion. Should we really be swapping kale for kelp?

Kale: It’s not easy being green

After a lot of convincing, Kale has finally been accepted as a health food staple. Whilst it is one of the most nutrient-dense plant foods in the world and looks decorative on a plate, it’s bitter-tasting leaves have been a challenge for those who don’t see value in trying to make it taste good for the health benefits. Featured on the menu of every trendy café you visit, kale boasts an array of superfood health claims:

  • Boosts your immune system
  • Very high in antioxidants
  • Cancer-fighting claims
  • Helps you feel fuller for longer
  • May help lower cholesterol
  • May aid in weight-loss

The list goes on, but where has it gone wrong? Kale has faced a lot of backlash from health professionals, claiming that eating raw kale is not good for you and could be the most contaminated vegetable on supermarket shelves. A study revealed about 60% of kale samples tested positive for a type of human carcinogenic, featuring on The Environmental Working Group’s “Dirty Dozen” list. Furthermore, according to the IIN kale’s nutrient-dense profile may also affect the thyroid, blood-clotting and function of the gut. So, for those with related health conditions, there really can be too much of a good thing.

Kale Smoothie
Kale Smoothies – A staple for superfood enthusiasts

Kelp: The understated vegetable of the sea

Kelp is not a staple in Western cultures like it has been for many years in Japan and across Asia, but this could be about to change. A strong competitor to the health benefits of kale, kelp is now sliding into a range of everyday dishes such as soups, salads, smoothies, snacks and even seasonings. Chef Jamie Oliver has even referred to seaweed as “the most nutritious vegetable in the world” and claims it has credited to his weight loss. The hype around kelp as a new superfood closely echoes that of kale:

  • Disease and cancer-fighting claims
  • Weight-loss benefits
  • High in antioxidants
  • Featuring a range of nutrients
  • Rich in vitamins and minerals

But much like kale, there has been early signs of disclosure that kelp’s superfood properties may not be suitable for everyone. Once again, addressing the possible affect on the thyroid and the blood, kelp also absorbs heavy metals which can be hazardous for our health. As the kelp demand begins to take off, there are also questions around sustaining the supply long-term. Kelp forests have been greatly impacted by the increasing ocean temperatures and seabeds are vanishing in places such as south-east of Tokyo, “in what experts warn is a glimpse into the apocalyptic future facing Japan and its fishermen” says The Guardian.

Kelp in Fine Dining by @chefwilliameick, Instagram

The facts of the fad

Here is a comparison showing a handful of the nutritional elements for kelp and kale:

 KELP (per 100g)KALE (per 100g)
Energy (kJ)180kJ176kJ
Water Content81.58g87g
Proteins1.68g2.8g
Dietary Fibre1.3g1.7g
Carbohydrates9.57g8.32g
Calcium168mg205mg
Iron2.85mg3mg
Potassium89mg450mg
Magnesium121mg88mg
Zinc1.23mg0.37mg
Sodium233mg70mg
Vitamin A (IU)116IU3100IU
Vitamin B60mg0.23mg
Vitamin C3mg130mg

View the source of the full nutritional table here.

Based on these nutritional facts, it is clear that both kelp and kale are rich in health benefits and either would be a healthy addition to your meals, based on your dietary requirements. It could be viewed from this table that either vegetable is slightly more favourable nutritionally than the other, as it is measured by the individual and our differing dietary requirements.

So, is kelp the new kale?

Depending on the evolving addition of kelp in everyday recipes and your dietary needs, we conclude that whilst both kelp and kale have their pros and cons, either would be a healthy addition to your diet in moderation. Preference of taste and texture is also a factor here, for some may prefer to add kale’s strong, earthy taste to a dish rather than the oceanic flavour which kelp may bring. Knowledge is truly the key to identifying whether a superfood is really ‘super’ for you. If a new food trend is actually beneficial to what our body needs, the health benefits will hold their weight in facts.

Tell us what you prefer – kelp or kale?


This article was originally published by Worldchefs Education Partner Le Cordon Bleu.