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Celebrating the graduates of the Like A Chef program in St. Lucia

Celebrating the graduates of the Like A Chef program in St. Lucia

  • The Like A Chef program, a Feed the Planet initiative driven by Worldchefs, Electrolux Food Foundation, and AIESEC, hosted the first graduation for 2024 in St. Lucia.
  • Graduates received comprehensive culinary education, encompassing cooking techniques and strategies for reducing food waste, to help them identify suitable employment
  • The unique Like a Chef initiative was launched in 2017 with a goal to educate and train 3,000 people worldwide by 2030. Learn more about Feed the Planet programs including Like A Chef at feedtheplanet.worldchefs.org.

This May, the fourth cohort of students graduated from Worldchefs’ Like a Chef program in St. Lucia! Over twelve weeks, the fourteen students learned essential skills in the kitchen to prepare them for a future career in the culinary industry.

The Like a Chef program in St. Lucia launched on February 14th, 2023 by founder Jordann Norbert. Since then, a total of 54 students have graduated from the program over four cohorts.

Graduates from our Like a Chef program never fail to inspire us and this group of graduates is no different. Take it from founder Jordann Norbert herself:

We have had some really inspiring stories come out of this cohort. One being a return student who started out with us last year in our second cohort and got caught up with the law which affected him not being able to complete the program. However during his first appearance before the judge she learned of the program he was completing and was very impressed. She ordered that he had to return to complete the program in it’s entirety as a stipulation during his probational period. He did exactly that, participating in this cohort and successfully completing the program. He will be starting his internship next week at one of our most highly decorated restaurants here on island. We are super proud of him.

Training chefs in sustainability practices is crucial for St. Lucia’s food industry, given the island’s heavy reliance on tourism and its vibrant culinary scene. Realizing the importance of sustainable practices in the kitchen, Jordann Norbert decided to incorporate Worldchefs’ Sustainability Education for Culinary Professionals course into the Like a Chef program. By equipping chefs with the knowledge and skills to source local ingredients, minimize food waste, and adopt eco-friendly cooking methods, the graduates of this program can help St. Lucia reduce its dependence on imported foods and support local agriculture. Sustainable practices in the kitchen not only enhance the island’s food security but also ensure a resilient food system that can withstand the impacts of climate change.

The students and graduates of Like a Chef in St. Lucia are motivated by their desire to create a better future for themselves and the planet. Their stories never cease to amaze us.

Another remarkable story is that of a single mother who, despite facing numerous challenges, excelled in the program. Her hard work and perseverance paid off when she was recently hired as a senior chef at Jade Mountain, one of the world’s top hotels. Her journey from unemployment to securing such a prestigious position is truly inspirational.

Jordann Norbert, Like a Chef St. Lucia founder

As Like a Chef in St. Lucia prepares to launch the second cohort in June, we look forward to following the success stories of more inspiring graduates as they shape the future of the culinary industry.

Impacting Communities

Like a Chef was launched in late 2017 with a goal to educate and train 3000 people worldwide by 2030. Founded and driven by Worldchefs together with Electrolux Food Foundation, the Like a Chef program is an employment training initiative that provides professional culinary skills to underprivileged individuals. The program emphasizes sustainable cooking methods with a zero-waste approach.

Adapted to each community it serves, the program empowers various groups in need, including refugees, single parents, cancer survivors, and orphaned teenagers, to provide for themselves and their families. With over 1000 graduates, there have been eight training centers around the world in Brazil, Poland, Egypt, Sweden, St. Lucia, Russia, and Ukraine.

“This project is really tailored to the needs of local communities. Together with our partner Worldchefs, Electrolux Food Foundation really wanted to give back to local communities and that’s the purpose and the secret of the success of this initiative,” said Cosimo Scarano, Head of Electrolux Food Foundation. “We are very honored to see the recognition coming for this program and are every day more and more convinced of its potential in changing people’s lives. Thanks to my team and to everyone who contributes daily to Like a Chef implementation and success.”

Take Action

The Like a Chef program is made possible with the support of Feed the Planet partners and the tireless contributions of Worldchefs’ members around the globe. Worldchefs extends the utmost gratitude to all program participants, local partners, sponsors, and volunteer chefs who contribute to the life-changing success of Like a Chef and all Feed the Planet initiatives. It is the dedication of Worldchefs’ global community that fosters resilience and solidarity in the industry and beyond.

“It’s an incredible honor to have been able to help change the lives of over 1000 people through the Like a Chef program, and the only way this is possible is through the diverse partnership of Worldchefs, Electrolux Food Foundation, and AIESEC, which together forms the backbone of Feed the Planet,” says Feed the Planet Chairman, Chris Koetke. “We look forward to expanding our program and reaching more lives in the years to come.”

To learn more about Feed the Planet and the Like a Chef program, visit feedtheplanet.worldchefs.org.

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Young Chefs Are Taking the Industry Back to School

Young Chefs Are Taking the Industry Back to School: In Conversation with Rebecca van Bommel, Worldchefs Young Chefs Ambassador

What do the next generation of industry leaders have to say about key challenges for the future? We hear from Rebecca van Bommel, an up-and-coming culinary voice and one to watch. Her early career already has an impressive résumé: Worldchefs Global Development of Young Chefs Committee member, Culinary Federation Canada’s Young Chef Liaison, Red Seal Certified Young Chef, and competitor with Culinary Team Canada. She shares her insights to help pave the way for young people in hospitality.
How did you wind up in this profession? What was your pathway?

I knew from the start that I wanted to pursue something in the culinary field. I’ve always loved baking, making different desserts for my family and friends, cooking. As soon as I finished high school, I went straight into a two-year culinary school program and that just solidified the passion I had for the industry and how much I loved it. From there, I did some apprenticeships in Ireland and really enjoyed that as well, and just kept cooking. I did a few different avenues—hotels, local pubs, a Michelin star—and then COVID hit and the industry slowed down a bit. Some chefs I had been working with previously on a contract basis at food shows reached out to me and had a food sales position open. And that’s how I transitioned over into that avenue. I’ve been enjoying it.

What do you love about being in the food broker world?

The food broker world I love because you get to see behind-the-scenes. I get to interact and talk with different chefs every single day, talk to them about what products they’re using and why, and get a little insight into their restaurant or their business and how they run things and what they prefer. It’s really cool for me, coming from a chef background, to get a behind-the-scenes look into different chefs’ lives, so that’s been enjoyable for me.

You also cook at a retirement home. What is unique about serving that market?

Working in the retirement community, that opportunity also presented itself during COVID. I got into that world and realized—wow—they make really good food. We serve steak, we serve lamb, we serve lobster tails to our residents.

Depending on the restaurant, you often don’t get to talk to the people who are eating your food. Retirement is completely different because it’s the same people every single day, and you can actually build a relationship with them, find out their likes and dislikes. There’s a lot of creativity allowed in retirement. You’re not making the same dishes every day like you would often in a restaurant. Every day is different. And you can take what the residents are telling you, what they love, what they don’t love, and take that into account and create amazing food for them.

Competition—it’s something you do a lot at a very high level. Any lessons learned from the competition world?

I did my first competition while I was still in culinary school. It was a small, local one. I said, ‘I’ll do this just for fun. See where it goes. Just have fun with it.’ I got 1st place. And then I was kind of like, oh, this is fun.

It’s a good stress. It’s a stress, but it’s a stress that motivates you to want to try better. Segueing from that competition, I was invited to compete at the Culinary Olympics on a regional team. And that was probably the most stressful summer of my life—the practicing and preparing—and I said, ‘I will never do this again. This is not worth it.’ But then we got to IKA. Just to see all the other competitors and how big it is, and how proud you feel. Now I’m on my third Culinary Olympics team, and I don’t think that’s over any time soon.

Let’s jump into the world of sustainability. Where are our young people in this equation?

I think young chefs especially are extremely aware about sustainability in the industry and in their careers. I know it was something we talked about when I was in culinary school and how important it is to prevent food waste. Food waste is a huge part of it, and I think young chefs for the most part are very much aware and try to do their best about that. Another big factor is plastic waste, which again resurfaced with the pandemic because there was a lot of single-use plastics that were necessary at the time.

Young chefs are definitely aware of it and know that in order to have a bright future it’s something that they need to be mindful of on a daily basis. The issue with young chefs is sometimes they don’t have the support in their jobs to be able to do those types of things.

Are they empowered to make that change?

I would say it largely depends on what type of restaurant they’re in. For example, I’ve worked in a small local pub that got a lot of their ingredients from local farmers, and we used everything we could. We’d use carrot tops to make pesto and if we were to get fresh meat in, we’d use every part of the animal.

But then on the other hand, you have things like fine dining and Michelin stars, where they’ll make a square pan of something and cut out circles, and then you have all this waste. Or they’ll only pick the most perfect-looking carrots to put on the plate because of course we eat with their eyes first, and that’s important for that level of dining.

I think it depends on where they’re working. Young chefs in a smaller, independent restaurant would feel more empowered than say, a Michelin-starred restaurant where there’s that level, that standard that they have to keep up. And it’s so much harder to do that sustainably.

How about in competition?

With competitions it’s very hard to keep it sustainable, especially with the number of practice runs you have to go through to get to the competition. But I know even in the rules and the judging criteria, they’re becoming a lot more mindful of that.

In the past, where you might have used plastic tasting spoons, now the standard is to use wood or bamboo, something compostable. Same with sorting waste. They really focus on that. If you have trim from vegetables that you could use in a soup or use in another dish—save that, set it aside, put that to use. It’s a big focus, but it’s hard to do.

Another thing we try to do on our team—one of our competitions is cooking for 110 people. If we’re going to do a practice run, we want to find either 110 people we can feed so that food is not going to waste, or somewhere we can donate the food.

What would your advice be to a young person who wants to do things sustainably at a workplace where that’s not a priority?

I would say to start with a small change, because even the small things make a difference. You’re not going to change the chef’s mindset overnight and suddenly everything’s going to be sustainable. But if there’s one little thing, one little practice in the restaurant where you could suggest a more sustainable alternative, start with that. And that might open the doors for future conversations. That might get the chef thinking as well, ‘What else could I do? That was an easy change that didn’t affect the quality of my food at all. What else could I do to be more sustainable?’

Is sustainability something that is top of mind for young chefs looking for a place to work?

It’s hard to speak on behalf of all young chefs, but I would say sustainability isn’t necessarily top top. It’s definitely cuisine, style, food, and skill. But there is a niche in restaurants that are nose-to-tail or farm-to-table. In that sense, a lot of young chefs look for those types of establishments and want to work there, and those are more sustainable establishments naturally.

I don’t think they go in looking for sustainable businesses, but they might go looking for something that operates in that sense, where they’re very mindful of using local fresh ingredients and using every part of the ingredient.

What do you want to see from employers today?

Young people, we’re kind of driven by low risk, high reward. Going back to the pandemic as well, when a lot of chefs didn’t have work because restaurants were closed, it gave them a chance to breathe and a lot of them realized, ‘Why am I doing this to myself? Why am I working crazy, long hours, no days off? Really tough work environments, stressful work environments, no breaks. Why, when I could have better work-life balance?’ I think the pandemic brought that into focus. The working conditions that are typical of our industry, I’m not saying everywhere is like that but it’s kind of classically how it’s been.

There’s a big lack of workers because young chefs have realized ‘I don’t want this life anymore and if you can’t give me a more balanced schedule, some benefits, health benefits or otherwise, and better pay, I’m going to go to another industry.’

Do you think the foodservice community is doing enough to support young people as they grow into this profession?

A resounding no. What young chefs are looking for, and I hate to say it this way—money is a huge driver because at the end of the day, if you can’t put food on your own plate, why are you going to spend your time putting food on other people’s plates?

There are a lot of supports in place, like from Worldchefs, but when it comes to the actual work side of things, the typical environment, especially in restaurants, in the culinary industry, it’s not supportive of young chefs.

Can you give us one piece of advice for young chefs, and one piece of advice for those of us who have been in the industry for quite a while longer?

The piece of advice I have for young chefs I’m borrowing from one of my instructors in culinary school who told me this and it hit home and enhanced by experience as a young chef.

Take advantage of every opportunity that comes your way. Volunteer for everything. If you’re in school and there’s an event happening and they need two volunteers, put your hand up and join. If they’re having an amazing guest speaker but you have to give up your Saturday afternoon, go to that guest speaker. It’s going to enhance your experience and enhance your education. You can go to culinary school and pass all the courses and get the diploma, but if you haven’t gone above and beyond and done all the extras and joined competitions, you’re not getting the same experience as someone who has.

Go online, go to Worldchefs, take part in these webinars, take part in these free courses, especially the sustainability ones because that’s where the future’s going. And do all these extra things and you will have so much more knowledge and so many more tools to empower you going out into the workforce.

And for the more established generation of chefs?

Listen to the young chefs. While more accomplished chefs, of course they have a world of experience. They’ve been here, they’ve been there, they’ve done this and that in many competitions and cooked in many different places and have tons of knowledge and experience from that.

But still, keep in mind to listen to the younger generation of people who aren’t so established, people just starting out. They also have very valuable ideas and valuable knowledge themselves and can teach you things that you may not have even thought of. Sustainability would be a huge one of those because it’s something we think about a lot more and we grew up with and know more about that we could teach to you.


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Young Chefs get a discounted rate to Worldchefs Congress & Expo 2024, in Singapore this October! Don’t miss the Bill Gallagher Young Chefs Forum and your chance to connect with industry leaders!

Looking for more ways to get involved with an international community of motivated Young Chefs? Learn more about Worldchefs’ Young Chefs Club here.

Learn more about Worldchefs’ Feed the Planet programs at www.feedtheplanet.worldchefs.org.

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Start your journey towards a more conscious kitchen with Worldchefs’ FREE online Sustainability Education for Culinary Professionals course on Worldchefs Academy! Learn about key topics in food systems at your own pace, and give your career a boost with a valuable digital badge to show you’ve completed the training program.

Feed the Planet is powered by our friends at Electrolux Food Foundation. Visit the Electrolux Food Foundation website here and explore Replate at replate.com.

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Worldchefs Sustainability Food Heroes Workshop at ICS Paris

Worldchefs Sustainability Food Heroes Workshop at ICS Paris

Partnership for a better future

In a bid to foster sustainability and culinary excellence, ICS Paris International School proudly collaborated with Worldchefs as part of its Eco-Week celebrations. The workshop, conducted by Worldchefs, immersed students in the world of culinary artistry while emphasizing the importance of sustainability and responsible consumption.

During the interactive sessions, students from Grades 1 to 5 were encouraged to embrace their roles as “Food Heroes,” championing locally sourced produce and advocating against food waste. This partnership between ICS Paris International School and Worldchefs exemplifies a shared commitment to building a more sustainable future through education and practical engagement.

Through this collaboration, ICS Paris International School aims to empower students to become conscientious global citizens, equipped with the knowledge and skills needed to address pressing environmental challenges. By fostering partnerships with organizations like Worldchefs, the school is dedicated to cultivating a culture of sustainability and innovation, paving the way for a brighter, greener tomorrow.

_______________________

Afin d’encourager la durabilité et l’excellence culinaire, ICS Paris International School a fièrement collaboré avec Worldchefs dans le cadre de ses célébrations de l’Eco-Week. L’atelier, dirigé par Worldchefs, a plongé les élèves dans le monde de l’art culinaire tout en soulignant l’importance de la durabilité et de la consommation responsable.

Au cours des sessions interactives, les élèves du CP au CM2 ont été encouragés à assumer leur rôle de “héros de l’alimentation”, en défendant les produits d’origine locale et en luttant contre le gaspillage alimentaire. Ce partenariat entre l’école internationale ICS Paris et Worldchefs témoigne d’un engagement commun à construire un avenir plus durable par l’éducation et l’engagement pratique.

Grâce à cette collaboration, l’école internationale ICS Paris vise à donner aux élèves les moyens de devenir des citoyens du monde consciencieux, dotés des connaissances et des compétences nécessaires pour relever les défis environnementaux les plus pressants. En favorisant les partenariats avec des organisations telles que Worldchefs, l’école s’attache à cultiver une culture de la durabilité et de l’innovation, ouvrant ainsi la voie à un avenir plus brillant et plus vert.

Read the original article from ICS Paris: https://www.icsparis.fr/news-events/news-details/~board/news/post/worldchefs-sustainability-food-hero-workshop


Learn more about Worldchefs’ Feed the Planet programs at www.feedtheplanet.worldchefs.org.

Start your journey towards a more conscious kitchen with Worldchefs’ FREE online Sustainability Education for Culinary Professionals course on Worldchefs Academy! Learn about key topics in food systems at your own pace, and give your career a boost with a valuable digital badge to show you’ve completed the training program.

Feed the Planet is powered by our friends at Electrolux Food Foundation. Visit the Electrolux Food Foundation website here and explore Replate at replate.com.

André Wiringa Start Reverse
Reverse Leadership Strategy
Hospitality Brand Transformation
Customer Experience

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Sustainability Champions at LPU Laguna

Sustainability education is becoming increasingly important as we face new challenges due to the climate crisis. At Lyceum of the Philippines University (LPU) in Laguna, students are not only learning about sustainable practices—they’re also putting their knowledge into action through their participation in Worldchefs’ Feed the Planet programs.
from principles to practice

As part of the Sustainability Education for Culinary Professionals initiative, LPU Laguna students undergo training in sustainable cooking techniques and work with local farmers to source seasonal, organic ingredients. The program has had a significant impact on the students, who have gained a deeper understanding of the importance of sustainable practices in the food industry. They have also developed new culinary skills and techniques that allow them to create delicious and nutritious meals using locally sourced ingredients.

Beyond the students, the benefits are far-reaching. A positive impact on the environment and the local community is clear, too. By sourcing ingredients locally, the program reduces the carbon footprint of the industry and supports local farmers, who are often small-scale and face challenges in accessing markets.

The success of Feed the Planet programs at LPU Laguna is a testament to the power of sustainability education. By providing students with the knowledge and skills to create sustainable food practices, they are not only making a positive impact on the environment, but they are also preparing for careers in the food industry that are increasingly focused on sustainability.

a feed the Planet champion

Chef John Carlo Palacol, a faculty member of LPU, is making waves as a sustainability educator, inspiring students to be responsible stewards of the environment through their love of food. Palacol, a graduate of Culinary Arts and Hotel and Restaurant Management, has been teaching at LPU Laguna since 2015. With his extensive background in the food industry, he has been able to incorporate sustainability principles into his culinary classes, making sure that his and other chef instructors’ students understand the impact of their food choices on the environment.

Chef John Carlo Palacol
Sustainability Education
LPU Laguna
Chef John Carlo Palacol

He’s created a waste management program that teaches aspiring culinarians to sort waste and create nutrient-rich compost, spearheaded LPU Laguna’s Eye for the Green Kitchen program that teaches students how to cook from root-to-stem using locally sourced, seasonal, and organic ingredients and reduces the carbon footprint of the school’s kitchen, and mobilizing the culinary department to develop a sustainable farm, and soon a hyperlocal menus.

Palacol’s efforts in promoting sustainability have not gone unnoticed. This year he was awarded the Worldchefs’ Feed the Planet Champion Level 3 digital badge for his commitment to sustainable culinary practices.

As a sustainability educator, Palacol hopes to inspire his students to become responsible citizens and leaders in their communities. By instilling in them the values of sustainability, he believes that they can make a positive impact on the environment and create a better future for all. Chef John Carlo Palacol is a shining example of how educators can integrate sustainability principles into their teaching, inspiring students to become responsible stewards of the environment. He is a true champion of sustainability and a role model for students and educators alike.


Learn more about Worldchefs’ Feed the Planet programs at www.feedtheplanet.worldchefs.org.

Start your journey towards a more conscious kitchen with Worldchefs’ FREE online Sustainability Education for Culinary Professionals course on Worldchefs Academy! Learn about key topics in food systems at your own pace, and give your career a boost with a valuable digital badge to show you’ve completed the training program.

Feed the Planet is powered by our friends at Electrolux Food Foundation. Visit the Electrolux Food Foundation website here and explore Replate at replate.com.

André Wiringa Start Reverse
Reverse Leadership Strategy
Hospitality Brand Transformation
Customer Experience

Cover image: LPU Laguna CITHM 

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#ShowUsYourPlate highlights from World Food Day 2023

On October 16th, 2023 we celebrated World Food Day! Chefs from all around the world came together to celebrate our industry and reflect on ways to take action and shape a more sustainable future for the culinary world.

This year, we asked you to reflect on our impact on the planet, take action, and #ShowUsYourPlate. Over 196,963 chefs from around the world engaged in our campaign! We’re thankful to all of our chefs from around the world who shared their delicious, sustainable plates with us!

Here are just some of your creations!

World Food Day is yearly reminder of the importance of shaping a more sustainable and equitable food system. And it can be as easy as wasting less food, trying new things, and eating more plants but it will take all of us to take action every day! To find more information about how we can all create a more sustainable food future, check out our Feed the Planet projects.

Thank you to our partners, Electrolux Food Foundation and AIESEC To learn more about how we can sustainably feed our populations growing planet, check out “The Magic Puzzle: a film about sustainable food for today and tomorrow” from Electrolux Food Foundation.

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Nurturing a Sustainable Culinary Future: An Interview with Chef Haitham Hameed Hassoon

Nurturing a Sustainable Culinary Future: An Interview with Chef Haitham Hameed Hassoon

In an insightful conversation with Haitham Hameed Hassoon, a seasoned culinary professional and certified trainer in sustainability, we delve into the transformative journey that led him to embrace the Sustainability Education for Culinary Professionals program and the profound impact it has had on his career and the culinary industry at large.

When did you get involved with the Sustainability Education for Culinary Professionals program?

“I started participating in the Sustainability Program for Culinary Professionals program in 2019. I wanted to develop my knowledge in this field because of its great importance in correcting the grave errors that plague food systems and their sources. Then, the program provided the opportunity to become a trainer, so I quickly submitted my application to be one of the accredited trainers so that I could transfer this knowledge to the people of my Arab region, who work in the field of cooking and others. This way, I could help to develop their knowledge, urge them to abandon bad habits in consuming food, and show them the importances of sourcing to help them adhere to sustainable standards as a way of life. I was very happy to obtain approval to be an official certified trainer, and I still work very happily in this field.”

How many students have you trained so far?

“I announced my first course specialized in teaching sustainability after obtaining my trainer’s certificate. The title “sustainability” was strange to many when I announced it, and everyone was asking me about its meaning and how it could benefit them. I was happy to explain to them the meaning of sustainability and its importance in our daily lives and the future. Registration to attend these courses began, and my students were very enjoying attending these lessons, especially since I had prepared a curriculum that included video presentations for clarification. I was the first to use this method in the Arab region, as my students used to tell me. The lessons had a great positive impact on my students, and they told me that they had begun that they remember all the lessons and directions during their work and work on them in a way that meets the standards of sustainability and non-waste. So far, 1,059 students have graduated from the courses that I have provided. I still strive to spread the culture of sustainability more widely.”

Why cooking? What drove you to the kitchen to begin with?

“The world of cooking has been one of my personal hobbies since I was young, but at that time this profession was not widespread and was not viewed in the same way it is viewed now, as an important profession that has a major role in many areas of life. Therefore, I practiced the hobby of cooking on a limited basis at home and learned it from others or through books because there was no internet at the time. At the same time, I headed to study within the electrical specialty because it was one of the good and popular professions and specializations of many at the time. I continued to develop my personal skills in cooking through books and home experience until I had the opportunity after many years to work in this field due to the war conditions that my country was going through. This was the beginning of my career in the profession, which was my favorite hobby. I participated in many culinary schools and academies to develop my skills. Finally, with a degree in culinary arts, I opened my first private restaurant in 2009 in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. Then I moved to work in Turkey in 2017, and through my stay in Turkey I obtained more advanced certificates in the culinary arts, worked in a catering company, and an international company, and contributed to the opening of many Arab restaurants in Istanbul. In addition, I went into teaching the culinary profession after obtaining a training certificate, and I obtained accreditation from a specialized culinary academy to be one of its culinary trainers. I presented an integrated academic curriculum for teaching culinary arts that was approved by Worldchefs to be the first online education curriculum in the Arab region. I am still working within this curriculum in an effort to establish my academy for teaching culinary arts.”

What advice would you give to people who are interested in teaching others?

My advice to anyone who wants to work in education is to be sincere in what he presents to students, to search for the correct information and present it in a manner that is appropriate to the different cultural levels of others. Try your best to be popular person with your students through his personality, culture, and the way you speaks, respond to them, and listen to them. Be very humble without being weak. You must be very educated in various fields because this will increase your standing among students. You should apply what you says to yourself first so that you can be an example for your students. You must be firm during lessons without being harsh, and this will enable you to control the students’ listening and commitment. Teaching is a talent like other talents. Not everyone can deliver information to others in the desired manner, so make sure you possess this talent and always develop it. Do not make your goal of education only financial gain. Education is a humanitarian message above all else. Feeling that your students love you, that they rally around you, that they consider you their role model, and that they seek your help when needed is a feeling of happiness and pride that is unlike any other feeling; it is priceless.”

What sets this sustainability curriculum apart from others?

“The Sustainability Education Program for Culinary Professionals is distinguished by the fact that it is not a program to teach specific cooking recipes or discuss profitable topics. Rather, it discusses topics that are more important to our lives in general. This program highlights the hidden aspects of the culinary profession, those aspects that many may not see, including the amount of food and water available, the meaning of energy and fuel, the decreasing number of seafood, environmental damage, waste and its dangers. These aspects are not seen by the general public nor seen by chefs if we do not highlight them, make them a part of it, and hold them responsible for preserving them for the sake of their children’s future. This is what we are doing through the Sustainability Education for Culinary Professionals program. We are completely changing their lives in the right direction for a healthy and safe food future.

How do you think the culinary industry is different today from when you started?

“The cooking profession has changed a lot from where it started. In short, the cooking profession was based on skill only, and now it depends on knowledge and skill. We did not realize the importance of sterilization and hygiene, and we did not understand what cross-contamination meant. We did not know the extent to which wasting a quantity of food would affect the future of food. Now cooking has become a science, skills, art, and responsibility for preserving the planet’s food sources, in addition to the responsibility for preserving the health of others. Now the concepts of quantities, the size of a serving, the components of a dish, and the method of presentation have changed, and all of this is thanks to the scientific and cultural development of this profession. This is in addition to the great development in modern equipment and methods. One of the important things is that society’s view of the chef has changed a lot in a positive direction. The chef has gained a prominent position in society, and this has made young people’s desire to learn this profession greater.”

How did joining the Feed the Planet training program help you with your career?

My participation in the Sustainability Education Program for Culinary Professionals and the Feed the Planet Project has greatly contributed to my acquisition of many skills and information related to the culinary profession and training. In addition, it contributed a lot to introducing me as a professional trainer in the culinary profession, and this made the extent of my responsibility greater. I have become responsible for doing everything related to sustainability in my work to be an example for those who work with me and under my supervision. This has increased my personal skills in maintaining food safety and reducing waste to reach zero waste. I put the small quantities that are produced as waste when I prepare the recipes and put them in a bag from the beginning of the work day until the end. Then I put this bag on the scale to see the amount of waste produced throughout the work day, and I photograph all these steps to show them to my students. This greatly encouraged them to apply it in Their work, especially when they saw that the amount of waste that resulted from preparing me for a full day’s work did not even exceed 300 grams and it only contained some simple peels, dry onion ends, and similar things. This was a great motivation for them to apply it in their work.”

What’s a memorable success story or transformation you’ve witnessed in one of your students through the Sustainability Education for Culinary Professionals program?

“The abilities of many of my students developed according to what they were telling me. Sustainability lessons had a great impact on their work, and many of them used to tell me that they began to remember my words and directions while working, and they remembered that they must preserve food, not waste, and act wisely. Some of them told me that their officials decided to give them the job of supervising food preparation and production after they began working in a more scientific manner, based on the information they gained from my lessons in sustainability.”

In your view, what role can culinary professionals play in addressing global sustainability challenges, and what excites you about the future of sustainability in the culinary world?

If we, as culinary professionals, adhere to sustainability standards, we can make a significant change in the global food system and reduce the irresponsible behavior of some beneficiaries at the expense of the health and safety of the planet. Our commitment to sustainability standards will make polluted food sources unpopular in the market. It will make equipment designed and produced to standards that do not match sustainability standards become mere waste that no culinary professional will buy. Our role is great in not dealing with unreliable suppliers, which will support reliable suppliers, making them even more reliable, and encourage others to become reliable in order to promote the popularity of their goods. Our role is to educate and teach others who are not professional cooks, including women, students, professors, doctors, engineers, truck drivers, and all other segments of society, about the necessity of dealing with sustainability standards in our homes and workplaces, and that their small steps on the path to sustainability make our steps much larger to reach a food-safe planet. Training beginners in restaurants and cooking schools on how to deal with food sources, not to waste, to benefit from all parts, to invent new recipes from parts that were turning into waste, and to be creative in their use. Our role is important in changing the culture of customers in our restaurants and shifting their attention towards healthier dishes that rely on plants as an essential ingredient. Changing the culture of customers with the quantities allocated to each dish and the size of the portion. We can limit the violations that occur on seafood and other foods by boycotting those who violate their fishing rights during their reproductive times, not purchasing species that are on the verge of extinction, and not encouraging their actions for the purpose of financial gain. The honor of wearing the white jacket makes our role and responsibility great towards feeding the planet.”

What’s your vision for the next generation of culinary professionals who are passionate about sustainability? How do you hope they will influence the industry and the world at large?

“Through the sustainability lessons I provided to more than 1,000 students, and more to come, I instilled in them a sense of responsibility towards our planet and its future. We will have an educated generation that realizes the importance of its personal role in protecting food security, and they have become fully aware that every person has great importance in what he does and that in the end we will have a huge number of small steps that they have taken to constitute an influential factor in the food industry in the right direction and to protect our resources and our planet. I taught them that they are not just chefs who make one or a hundred dishes, but that they are now responsible for the future of food and for the safety and health of their customers, and are responsible for preserving the quantity of food through their careful handling of waste and achieving zero waste. My students learned that the culinary profession is now no less important than the medical profession, or the engineering profession, or any other influential profession, and that they have an important and influential role in shaping the future of the planet and the future of future generations. They feel proud as they work and are committed to not wasting food and are proud to tell me their stories in applying the sustainability standards that I taught them. We will have a generation that we can be proud of, and they will have a very big role in putting things back on track in the field of food sources and the environment.”


Take action

Start the Sustainability Education for Culinary Professionals course for free at www.worldchefsacademy.com, and receive a digital badge to show your achievement.

The Worldchefs Academy mobile app can be downloaded on both the App Store and Google Play, and at www.worldchefsacademy.com.

Sustainability Education for Culinary Professionals is made possible with the support of Feed the Planet partners and the tireless contributions of Worldchefs’ members around the globe. Worldchefs extends the utmost gratitude to all course participants, program trainers, and educational institutions who bring their time, expertise, and vision to all Feed the Planet initiatives.

To learn more about Feed the Planet, visit feedtheplanet.worldchefs.org.

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News Press Releases National FeedThePlanet

‘Like A Chef’ in Stockholm hosts first graduation

‘Like A Chef’ in Stockholm hosts first graduation

  • The Like A Chef program, a Feed the Planet initiative driven by Worldchefs, Electrolux Food Foundation, and AIESEC, hosted a graduation ceremony for its first wave of students in Stockholm.
  • Graduates received comprehensive culinary education, encompassing cooking techniques and strategies for reducing food waste, to help them identify suitable employment
  • The unique Like a Chef initiative was launched in 2017 with a goal to educate and train 3,000 people worldwide by 2030. Learn more about Feed the Planet programs including Like A Chef at feedtheplanet.worldchefs.org.

Paris, 13 October 2023 – In a ceremony held this past September, the ‘Like A Chef’ program in Stockholm celebrated the graduation of its first cohort of students, marking a significant milestone in their employment journey. The event marked a heartwarming celebration of each student’s success in finishing the life-altering culinary training program.

Supported by Feed the Planet partners, Worldchefs and the Electrolux Food Foundation, and in collaboration with Svenska Kockars Förening, Sodexo, Stockholms Stad, and Arbetsförmedlingen, the Like a Chef employment training program in Stockholm has successfully trained and empowered new generation of kitchen professionals.

Stockholms Stad and Arbetsförmedlingen selected nine participants marginalized communities grappling with unemployment, including immigrants and young residents of city suburbs, to partake in the Like A Chef training program held in Stockholm, Sweden. Led by professional chefs from Worldchefs’ National Association member Svenska Kockars Förening, the curriculum encompassed cooking techniques and food waste reduction strategies with a sustainability focus.

Over the course of a 120-hour culinary training program, students gained culinary expertise, enabling them to identify viable employment opportunities and achieve financial stability. Six of the graduates have already secured unique internship opportunities at Sodexo’s Stockholm restaurants and Clarion Hotel Stockholm, contributing to the sustainability efforts in the hospitality industry.

“The Like a Chef program is training the next generation of kitchen professionals that will help shape the industry on a new basis, where food and its impact on the planet are taking the center stage,” says Cosimo Scarano, Head of the Electrolux Food Foundation. 

For more information about the ‘Like A Chef’ program, please visit https://feedtheplanet.worldchefs.org/like-a-chef/.

Impacting Communities

Like a Chef was launched in late 2017 with a goal to educate and train 3000 people worldwide by 2030. Founded and driven by Worldchefs together with Electrolux Food Foundation, the Like a Chef program is an employment training initiative that provides professional culinary skills to underprivileged individuals. The program emphasizes sustainable cooking methods with a zero-waste approach.

Adapted to each community it serves, the program empowers various groups in need, including refugees, single parents, cancer survivors, and orphaned teenagers, to provide for themselves and their families. With over 1000 graduates, there have been eight training centers around the world in Brazil, Poland, Egypt, Sweden, St. Lucia, Russia, and Ukraine.

“This project is really tailored to the needs of local communities. Together with our partner Worldchefs, Electrolux Food Foundation really wanted to give back to local communities and that’s the purpose and the secret of the success of this initiative,” said Cosimo Scarano, Head of Electrolux Food Foundation. “We are very honored to see the recognition coming for this program and are every day more and more convinced of its potential in changing people’s lives. Thanks to my team and to everyone who contributes daily to Like a Chef implementation and success.”

Take action

The Like a Chef program is made possible with the support of Feed the Planet partners and the tireless contributions of Worldchefs’ members around the globe. Worldchefs extends the utmost gratitude to all program participants, local partners, sponsors, and volunteer chefs who contribute to the life-changing success of Like a Chef and all Feed the Planet initiatives. It is the dedication of Worldchefs’ global community that fosters resilience and solidarity in the industry and beyond.

“It’s an incredible honor to have been able to help change the lives of over 1000 people through the Like a Chef program, and the only way this is possible is through the diverse partnership of Worldchefs, Electrolux Food Foundation, and AIESEC, which together forms the backbone of Feed the Planet,” says Feed the Planet Chairman, Chris Koetke. “We look forward to expanding our program and reaching more lives in the years to come.”

To learn more about Feed the Planet and the Like a Chef program, visit feedtheplanet.worldchefs.org.

Read more in the latest issue of Worldchefs Magazine

Head to page 47 in Issue 29 to read more about how the Like a Chef program is changing lives.

From mastering the art of sustainable cooking to embracing the latest technological advancements in the kitchen, Worldchefs Magazine is your guide to staying at the forefront of the culinary profession. 

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FeedThePlanet

Championing Sustainability in the Culinary World: An Interview with Chef Montaser Masoud

Championing Sustainability in the Culinary World: An Interview with Chef Montaser Masoud

In a candid conversation, Chef Montaser Masoud reveals his remarkable journey in promoting sustainability among culinary professionals, his passion for preserving human health, and his dreams for a more sustainable culinary industry.

The culinary landscape is evolving, and at its forefront stands Chef Montaser Masoud, a culinary visionary with an unwavering commitment to sustainability and cultivating a new generation of eco-conscious culinary professionals. We had the privilege of sitting down with Chef Montaser Masoud to discuss his involvement in the Sustainability Education for Culinary Professionals program, his experiences training chefs, and his vision for the future of sustainability in the culinary world.

When did you get involved with the Sustainability Education for Culinary Professionals program?

“In 2019, I embarked on my journey in sustainability education by receiving training from the World Association of Chefs Societies. I was among the first group of trainees, and in 2020, I became a certified trainer, specializing in teaching sustainability to culinary professionals as part of the “Train the Trainers’ program.”

How many students have you trained so far?

“My involvement in sustainability education has been profoundly transformative. I’ve had the privilege of training 1,895 chefs across diverse regions, including Egypt, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Syria, Kuwait, Qatar, UAE, Oman, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, Germany, and Turkey.”

sustainability
sustainability Education
Chef Montaser Masoud, featured center, with students of the Sustainability Education for Culinary Professionals course

Why cooking? What drove you to the kitchen to begin with?

“Cooking, for me, represents a beautiful realm filled with creativity and a deep sense of responsibility for ensuring people’s safety from contaminated food. Over time, I realized the paramount importance of sustainability. In the past, discussions around food primarily focused on ingredients and cleanliness but rarely touched on food sources, environmental harmony, or sustainability. My passion for this field grew as I delved deeper into the intricacies of sustainability. I explored costing, calculations, and the ever-evolving landscape of food. Throughout my 36-year journey in the hotel industry, I witnessed the emergence of new products promoting vegetarianism and alternative ingredients. This journey led me to create unique sustainable ingredients, including plant-based alternatives, which gained recognition among my peers. The concept of sustainability later crystallized my purpose, connecting it with energy efficiency and responsible sourcing of ingredients, leading to reduced waste and resource conservation. My dedication to the kitchen extends beyond just cooking; it revolves around safeguarding human health. I firmly believe that honesty is the cornerstone of the chef-customer relationship, especially when dealing with allergies or dietary restrictions. The kitchen has evolved into a discipline that combines chemistry, physics, and medicine, offering a holistic approach to food preparation and consumption.”

“Throughout my career, I consistently explored methods to minimize food waste. I became dedicated to reducing waste and preserving valuable resources. I researched equipment that could facilitate the decomposition of food waste, turning it into animal feed, soil enrichment, or nourishment for small-scale farms. My experiences in sustainable practices extended to villages near hotels, where I initiated initiatives to transform food waste into sustainable animal feed and natural fertilizers. Collaborating with friends in Tunisia and Morocco, we successfully dried kosher food items and vegetables, ground them, and repurposed them for agricultural use. These practices have yielded positive results and were presented in reports with accompanying visuals.”

What advice would you give to people who are interested in teaching others?

“Sharing insights as an educator, I offer valuable advice to those interested in teaching and mentoring in the culinary profession or sustainability-related fields. First, I encourage educators to introduce unexpected elements in their teaching methods. Expose students to thought-provoking documentaries like ‘Garbage Village,’ ‘Some Seas,’ and ‘Some Contaminated Food.’ Such content can help direct their attention towards sustainability. Additionally, incorporating humor through funny videos can enhance the learning experience. When explaining sustainability concepts, it’s crucial to remain adaptable and acknowledge that awareness and understanding may vary among students. To avoid repeating past mistakes and to adapt to evolving circumstances, students should be equipped with the tools of experiential learning. Not all experiences hold the same educational weight; some offer profound lessons in sustainability, while others provide smaller insights. It’s essential to recognize that isolation and detachment from diverse experiences hinder learning from past experiences.”

What sets this sustainability curriculum apart from others?

“Sustainability is a profound concept that has taken center stage in the 21st century. It plays a critical role in preserving our resources in a world abundant with riches. While we can imagine a future where some resources, such as water, energy, fish populations, lakes, and even rainfall, might become scarce, sustainability serves as our safeguard. The key lies in preserving these resources not only in our kitchens but also in our professional lives and homes. Those who embark on a journey of sustainability become well-versed in its many facets. The field of energy has evolved into a complex landscape, with several countries embracing clean energy practices to secure their futures. The creation of artificial lakes, for instance, acknowledges the potential depletion of natural fish populations. Sustainable practices include plant-based alternatives to animal protein, emphasizing the responsible utilization of grains and vegetables. This movement resonates with the new generation.”

Students in Palestine

How do you think the culinary industry is different today from when you started?

“It’s essential to recognize that the culinary industry has undergone significant transformations since my journey began 36 years ago. In the past, obtaining quality ingredients often involved intricate exchanges of information, recipes, or handwritten notes between chefs. Ingredients were not as readily available as they are today through online channels. However, the true transformation occurred with the advent of sustainability. This era, as I like to call it, revolutionized the world by instilling sustainable practices. Subsequently, we’ve entered a new era of growth, guided by the principles of sustainability. Sustainability now resides at the core of our dreams and actions, encompassing fields like artificial intelligence. Innovations such as plant-based meats produced through artificial intelligence, offering pure protein from vegetarian sources, have gained prominence. This concept is gaining traction in the Middle East and Europe, aligning with the United Nations’ visions for 2030 and 2050.”

How did joining the Feed the Planet training program help you with your career?

“My journey through the Feed the Planet training program was a transformative experience, expanding my dedication to sustainability. It broadened my perspective, leading me to consistently question the sustainability of various aspects of life. This transformation manifested in a simple yet profound question: ‘Are you a sustainable person?’ My career thrived as I became a role model, notably for my involvement as a trainer in sustainability for culinary professionals in the Arab world. We initiated efforts to educate chefs about the significance of sustainability and its application in their careers. This endeavor ignited a spark among people, prompting them to implement sustainability practices independently, a fact for which I extend gratitude to Worldchefs.”

What’s a memorable success story or transformation you’ve witnessed in one of your students through the Sustainability Education for Culinary Professionals program?

“Teaching sustainability in the Arab world came with its unique set of challenges, as many people had heard the term but did not fully grasp its meaning. It was a fulfilling endeavor to be part of a movement to teach these chefs what sustainability truly meant and how to integrate it into their professional lives. The most significant success story I’ve witnessed is the growing awareness of sustainability among chefs and their dedication to incorporating sustainable practices into various aspects of their lives. This achievement is a testament to the effectiveness of the education we provided through the program.”

In your view, what role can culinary professionals play in addressing global sustainability challenges, and what excites you about the future of sustainability in the culinary world?

“The role of culinary professionals in addressing global sustainability challenges is of paramount importance. We must take the initiative to train chefs on the ground to realize the dream of sustainability in the Arab world. This undertaking should encompass various forms of education, including film screenings and hands-on training in open symposiums over four to five days. My commitment to sustainability education extends to creating specialized courses in culinary schools, equipping future chefs with the knowledge and skills needed to implement sustainable practices. It’s my hope that all individuals, not just chefs, in the Arab world investigate and understand sustainability’s meaning to ensure a future where food, energy, fish populations, water resources, and more continue to thrive. We must remain steadfast in our quest to preserve these resources and promote a sustainable future. The journey of sustainability begins with us, and together we can drive positive change.”

What’s your vision for the next generation of culinary professionals who are passionate about sustainability? How do you hope they will influence the industry and the world at large?

“I am enthusiastic about teaching the next generation of chefs, instilling in them the significance of sustainability in the culinary world. My goal is to empower these young individuals to champion the cause of sustainability, not just within the culinary industry but also in the broader world. Through my writing, which spans Arabic, English, and French, I aim to reach chefs across different regions, fostering a shared understanding of sustainability. As a bridge between diverse culinary communities, I always make myself available to explain the intricacies of sustainability to those who seek knowledge. By engaging with this new generation, answering their questions, and providing valuable insights, I hope to create a community of sustainability advocates who can transform the culinary industry and beyond, aligning with the United Nations’ vision for a sustainable future by 2030 and 2050.”

Chef Montaser Masoud, featured center and sitting, with students of the Sustainability Education for Culinary Professionals course

Chef Montaser Masoud’s journey is a testament to the transformative power of sustainability education. His dedication to preserving human health and promoting sustainable practices is a beacon of hope for the culinary world and the global community at large. With visionary educators like Chef Montaser Masoud leading the way, the future of sustainability in the culinary industry is indeed promising.


Take action

Start the Sustainability Education for Culinary Professionals course for free at www.worldchefsacademy.com, and receive a digital badge to show your achievement.

The Worldchefs Academy mobile app can be downloaded on both the App Store and Google Play, and at www.worldchefsacademy.com.

Sustainability Education for Culinary Professionals is made possible with the support of Feed the Planet partners and the tireless contributions of Worldchefs’ members around the globe. Worldchefs extends the utmost gratitude to all course participants, program trainers, and educational institutions who bring their time, expertise, and vision to all Feed the Planet initiatives.

To learn more about Feed the Planet, visit feedtheplanet.worldchefs.org.

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FeedThePlanet

On this World Food Day, we’re celebrating you.

On this World Food Day, we’re celebrating you.

October 16th is World Food Day. It’s a day for reflection, for action, and also for celebration. A year ago we asked you to join us and chefs around the globe in a movement towards more equitable and sustainable food systems. We gave you the tools, and our community made a remarkable impact. To date:

  1. Worldchefs Sustainability Education for Culinary Professionals program, available in 8 languages on the free Worldchefs Academy platform, has prepared 146 trainers from 130 culinary institutions in 55 countries and reached nearly 11,000 graduates.
  2. The award-winning Like a Chef culinary employment program has changed the lives of more than 1,176 people, providing career training and support in 10 training centres around the world.
  3. The award-winning Food Heroes Challenge has educated over 116,000 kids about sustainable and healthy eating habits with a fun and interactive toolkit.
  4. Our webcast, Sustainability Around the World, has interviewed experts in 31 episodes, making the big conversations in food systems easy to digest for more than 700,000 viewers.
  5. The Feed the Planet partnership, with our amazing team at Worldchefs, Electrolux Food Foundation, and AIESEC, has brought inspiration to kitchens everywhere, with an international community of viewers numbering over 160 million. We’re happy you’re one of them.

What better way to celebrate than through food? Visit Replate to find inspiration for a new sustainable recipe, and be sure to #showusyourplate! 

Follow the steps below to get involved.

World Food Day
2023

#ThisIsWorldchefs #WorldFoodDay #FeedthePlanet

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FeedThePlanet

Food Heroes Wins Sustainability Education Award

Food Heroes Wins NORNS Awards Sustainability Education Program 2023

  • Food Heroes, a Feed the Planet initiative driven by Worldchefs, Electrolux Food Foundation, and AIESEC, has won the NORNS Awards Marketing & Creative – Sustainability Education Program 2023.
  • The NORNS Awards celebrate excellence and innovation worldwide by spotlighting professionals and organizations who, through hard work, collaboration, knowledge, and creativity, achieve results worthy of recognition.
  • Food Heroes was developed as part of UNICEF’s World’s Largest Lesson. The interactive workshop has inspired more than 130,000 children all over the world to develop healthier eating habits. Learn more about Feed the Planet programs including Food Heroes at feedtheplanet.worldchefs.org.

Paris, 13 July 2023 – The World Association of Chefs’ Societies (Worldchefs), together with Feed the Planet partners Electrolux Food Foundation, accepted the NORNS Awards Marketing & Creative – Sustainability Education Program 2023 for the Food Heroes program’s remarkable contributions to “transforming the landscape of food sustainability and accessibility”.

“It is with great pleasure and a deep sense of admiration that we present this well-deserved recognition,” said NORNS Awards co-founder, Elisa Mattos. “We want to recognize all these professionals who have demonstrated exceptional dedication, creativity, and passion in their respective fields, contributing significantly to building a more equitable and nourishing world, and remind of our collective responsibility to create a more sustainable and equitable food system. Let their achievements serve as a call to action, inspiring each one of us to become agents of change in our own communities.”

Food Heroes
Sustainability Education Award
Norns Awards
World's Largest Lesson

Developed as part of UNICEF’s World’s Largest Lesson, Food Heroes has inspired more than 130,000 children all over the world to develop healthier eating habits toward the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Delivered in more than 30 countries by Worldchefs’ members and Feed the Planet partners Electrolux Food Foundation and AIESEC, the interactive workshop gives kids the superpowers they need to make better everyday food choices to contribute toward a healthier planet.

The open-source Food Heroes toolkit, available in English, Swedish, Romanian, Portuguese, Polish, Hungarian, Spanish, Italian, Ukrainian, and Traditional Chinese, can be used by anyone—from parents and teachers to professional chefs—to raise awareness of the relationship between food and planetary health.

“We are so proud to receive the NORNS Sustainable Education award and for the chance to celebrate all our Food Heroes around the globe,” says Worldchefs President, Thomas A. Gugler. “Feed the Planet initiatives are making a global impact thanks to the dedication and hard work of the Worldchefs’ community, inspiring action in and out of the kitchen. It is so important that we continue our efforts to help youth and families navigate key issues of our time, and we believe in the ‘The Power of the White Jacket’ for chefs to help build a better future.”

“We did it, together,” said Cosimo Scarano, Head of Electrolux Food Foundation. “To know that the judges recognized Food Heroes in the fight against food insecurity, while promoting sustainable food practices and empowering communities fills me with a sense of purpose and heartfelt gratitude to our colleagues, partners, local communities, and educators, as we work together to build a more equitable and nourishing world. Mostly, it reminds me that even small actions make a big difference and that together, we can do so much.”

Become a Food Hero

Food Heroes provides toolkits, quizzes, and resources, along with fun visual assets developed by EY Doberman, to facilitate workshops that bring a sense of joy to discovering new ways of looking at food with engaging exercises, lots of laughter, and knowledge that lasts a lifetime.

Get all tools to run a Food Heroes workshop, available in English, Swedish, Romanian, Portuguese, Polish, Hungarian, Spanish, Italian, Ukrainian, and Traditional Chinese. Click the button below to download the latest version of the Food Heroes PowerPoint slide deck and the toolkit.

Take action

Food Heroes is made possible with the support of Feed the Planet partners and the tireless contributions of Worldchefs’ members around the globe. Worldchefs extends the utmost gratitude to all program participants, local partners, and sponsors who contribute to all Feed the Planet initiatives.

“Our amazing Food Heroes partnership has reached over 100,000 kids, with so many professional chefs active in countries around the globe,” says Ragnar Fridriksson, Worldchefs Managing Director. “Together we are working to empower and educate the next generation about healthy, nutritious food, which is so important to us.”

To learn more about Feed the Planet, visit feedtheplanet.worldchefs.org.

Read more in the latest issue of Worldchefs Magazine

Head to page 45 in Issue 29 to read more about how Feed the Planet programs are making an impact around the globe.

From mastering the art of sustainable cooking to embracing the latest technological advancements in the kitchen, Worldchefs Magazine is your guide to staying at the forefront of the culinary profession. 

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