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Young Chefs Are Taking the Industry Back to School

Young Chefs Are Taking the Industry Back to School: In Conversation with Rebecca van Bommel, Worldchefs Young Chefs Ambassador

What do the next generation of industry leaders have to say about key challenges for the future? We hear from Rebecca van Bommel, an up-and-coming culinary voice and one to watch. Her early career already has an impressive résumé: Worldchefs Global Development of Young Chefs Committee member, Culinary Federation Canada’s Young Chef Liaison, Red Seal Certified Young Chef, and competitor with Culinary Team Canada. She shares her insights to help pave the way for young people in hospitality.
How did you wind up in this profession? What was your pathway?

I knew from the start that I wanted to pursue something in the culinary field. I’ve always loved baking, making different desserts for my family and friends, cooking. As soon as I finished high school, I went straight into a two-year culinary school program and that just solidified the passion I had for the industry and how much I loved it. From there, I did some apprenticeships in Ireland and really enjoyed that as well, and just kept cooking. I did a few different avenues—hotels, local pubs, a Michelin star—and then COVID hit and the industry slowed down a bit. Some chefs I had been working with previously on a contract basis at food shows reached out to me and had a food sales position open. And that’s how I transitioned over into that avenue. I’ve been enjoying it.

What do you love about being in the food broker world?

The food broker world I love because you get to see behind-the-scenes. I get to interact and talk with different chefs every single day, talk to them about what products they’re using and why, and get a little insight into their restaurant or their business and how they run things and what they prefer. It’s really cool for me, coming from a chef background, to get a behind-the-scenes look into different chefs’ lives, so that’s been enjoyable for me.

You also cook at a retirement home. What is unique about serving that market?

Working in the retirement community, that opportunity also presented itself during COVID. I got into that world and realized—wow—they make really good food. We serve steak, we serve lamb, we serve lobster tails to our residents.

Depending on the restaurant, you often don’t get to talk to the people who are eating your food. Retirement is completely different because it’s the same people every single day, and you can actually build a relationship with them, find out their likes and dislikes. There’s a lot of creativity allowed in retirement. You’re not making the same dishes every day like you would often in a restaurant. Every day is different. And you can take what the residents are telling you, what they love, what they don’t love, and take that into account and create amazing food for them.

Competition—it’s something you do a lot at a very high level. Any lessons learned from the competition world?

I did my first competition while I was still in culinary school. It was a small, local one. I said, ‘I’ll do this just for fun. See where it goes. Just have fun with it.’ I got 1st place. And then I was kind of like, oh, this is fun.

It’s a good stress. It’s a stress, but it’s a stress that motivates you to want to try better. Segueing from that competition, I was invited to compete at the Culinary Olympics on a regional team. And that was probably the most stressful summer of my life—the practicing and preparing—and I said, ‘I will never do this again. This is not worth it.’ But then we got to IKA. Just to see all the other competitors and how big it is, and how proud you feel. Now I’m on my third Culinary Olympics team, and I don’t think that’s over any time soon.

Let’s jump into the world of sustainability. Where are our young people in this equation?

I think young chefs especially are extremely aware about sustainability in the industry and in their careers. I know it was something we talked about when I was in culinary school and how important it is to prevent food waste. Food waste is a huge part of it, and I think young chefs for the most part are very much aware and try to do their best about that. Another big factor is plastic waste, which again resurfaced with the pandemic because there was a lot of single-use plastics that were necessary at the time.

Young chefs are definitely aware of it and know that in order to have a bright future it’s something that they need to be mindful of on a daily basis. The issue with young chefs is sometimes they don’t have the support in their jobs to be able to do those types of things.

Are they empowered to make that change?

I would say it largely depends on what type of restaurant they’re in. For example, I’ve worked in a small local pub that got a lot of their ingredients from local farmers, and we used everything we could. We’d use carrot tops to make pesto and if we were to get fresh meat in, we’d use every part of the animal.

But then on the other hand, you have things like fine dining and Michelin stars, where they’ll make a square pan of something and cut out circles, and then you have all this waste. Or they’ll only pick the most perfect-looking carrots to put on the plate because of course we eat with their eyes first, and that’s important for that level of dining.

I think it depends on where they’re working. Young chefs in a smaller, independent restaurant would feel more empowered than say, a Michelin-starred restaurant where there’s that level, that standard that they have to keep up. And it’s so much harder to do that sustainably.

How about in competition?

With competitions it’s very hard to keep it sustainable, especially with the number of practice runs you have to go through to get to the competition. But I know even in the rules and the judging criteria, they’re becoming a lot more mindful of that.

In the past, where you might have used plastic tasting spoons, now the standard is to use wood or bamboo, something compostable. Same with sorting waste. They really focus on that. If you have trim from vegetables that you could use in a soup or use in another dish—save that, set it aside, put that to use. It’s a big focus, but it’s hard to do.

Another thing we try to do on our team—one of our competitions is cooking for 110 people. If we’re going to do a practice run, we want to find either 110 people we can feed so that food is not going to waste, or somewhere we can donate the food.

What would your advice be to a young person who wants to do things sustainably at a workplace where that’s not a priority?

I would say to start with a small change, because even the small things make a difference. You’re not going to change the chef’s mindset overnight and suddenly everything’s going to be sustainable. But if there’s one little thing, one little practice in the restaurant where you could suggest a more sustainable alternative, start with that. And that might open the doors for future conversations. That might get the chef thinking as well, ‘What else could I do? That was an easy change that didn’t affect the quality of my food at all. What else could I do to be more sustainable?’

Is sustainability something that is top of mind for young chefs looking for a place to work?

It’s hard to speak on behalf of all young chefs, but I would say sustainability isn’t necessarily top top. It’s definitely cuisine, style, food, and skill. But there is a niche in restaurants that are nose-to-tail or farm-to-table. In that sense, a lot of young chefs look for those types of establishments and want to work there, and those are more sustainable establishments naturally.

I don’t think they go in looking for sustainable businesses, but they might go looking for something that operates in that sense, where they’re very mindful of using local fresh ingredients and using every part of the ingredient.

What do you want to see from employers today?

Young people, we’re kind of driven by low risk, high reward. Going back to the pandemic as well, when a lot of chefs didn’t have work because restaurants were closed, it gave them a chance to breathe and a lot of them realized, ‘Why am I doing this to myself? Why am I working crazy, long hours, no days off? Really tough work environments, stressful work environments, no breaks. Why, when I could have better work-life balance?’ I think the pandemic brought that into focus. The working conditions that are typical of our industry, I’m not saying everywhere is like that but it’s kind of classically how it’s been.

There’s a big lack of workers because young chefs have realized ‘I don’t want this life anymore and if you can’t give me a more balanced schedule, some benefits, health benefits or otherwise, and better pay, I’m going to go to another industry.’

Do you think the foodservice community is doing enough to support young people as they grow into this profession?

A resounding no. What young chefs are looking for, and I hate to say it this way—money is a huge driver because at the end of the day, if you can’t put food on your own plate, why are you going to spend your time putting food on other people’s plates?

There are a lot of supports in place, like from Worldchefs, but when it comes to the actual work side of things, the typical environment, especially in restaurants, in the culinary industry, it’s not supportive of young chefs.

Can you give us one piece of advice for young chefs, and one piece of advice for those of us who have been in the industry for quite a while longer?

The piece of advice I have for young chefs I’m borrowing from one of my instructors in culinary school who told me this and it hit home and enhanced by experience as a young chef.

Take advantage of every opportunity that comes your way. Volunteer for everything. If you’re in school and there’s an event happening and they need two volunteers, put your hand up and join. If they’re having an amazing guest speaker but you have to give up your Saturday afternoon, go to that guest speaker. It’s going to enhance your experience and enhance your education. You can go to culinary school and pass all the courses and get the diploma, but if you haven’t gone above and beyond and done all the extras and joined competitions, you’re not getting the same experience as someone who has.

Go online, go to Worldchefs, take part in these webinars, take part in these free courses, especially the sustainability ones because that’s where the future’s going. And do all these extra things and you will have so much more knowledge and so many more tools to empower you going out into the workforce.

And for the more established generation of chefs?

Listen to the young chefs. While more accomplished chefs, of course they have a world of experience. They’ve been here, they’ve been there, they’ve done this and that in many competitions and cooked in many different places and have tons of knowledge and experience from that.

But still, keep in mind to listen to the younger generation of people who aren’t so established, people just starting out. They also have very valuable ideas and valuable knowledge themselves and can teach you things that you may not have even thought of. Sustainability would be a huge one of those because it’s something we think about a lot more and we grew up with and know more about that we could teach to you.


chefs
young chefs
rebecca van bommel
sustainability

Young Chefs get a discounted rate to Worldchefs Congress & Expo 2024, in Singapore this October! Don’t miss the Bill Gallagher Young Chefs Forum and your chance to connect with industry leaders!

Looking for more ways to get involved with an international community of motivated Young Chefs? Learn more about Worldchefs’ Young Chefs Club here.

Learn more about Worldchefs’ Feed the Planet programs at www.feedtheplanet.worldchefs.org.

chefs
young chefs
rebecca van bommel
sustainability

Start your journey towards a more conscious kitchen with Worldchefs’ FREE online Sustainability Education for Culinary Professionals course on Worldchefs Academy! Learn about key topics in food systems at your own pace, and give your career a boost with a valuable digital badge to show you’ve completed the training program.

Feed the Planet is powered by our friends at Electrolux Food Foundation. Visit the Electrolux Food Foundation website here and explore Replate at replate.com.

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FeedThePlanet

Worldchefs Sustainability Food Heroes Workshop at ICS Paris

Worldchefs Sustainability Food Heroes Workshop at ICS Paris

Partnership for a better future

In a bid to foster sustainability and culinary excellence, ICS Paris International School proudly collaborated with Worldchefs as part of its Eco-Week celebrations. The workshop, conducted by Worldchefs, immersed students in the world of culinary artistry while emphasizing the importance of sustainability and responsible consumption.

During the interactive sessions, students from Grades 1 to 5 were encouraged to embrace their roles as “Food Heroes,” championing locally sourced produce and advocating against food waste. This partnership between ICS Paris International School and Worldchefs exemplifies a shared commitment to building a more sustainable future through education and practical engagement.

Through this collaboration, ICS Paris International School aims to empower students to become conscientious global citizens, equipped with the knowledge and skills needed to address pressing environmental challenges. By fostering partnerships with organizations like Worldchefs, the school is dedicated to cultivating a culture of sustainability and innovation, paving the way for a brighter, greener tomorrow.

_______________________

Afin d’encourager la durabilité et l’excellence culinaire, ICS Paris International School a fièrement collaboré avec Worldchefs dans le cadre de ses célébrations de l’Eco-Week. L’atelier, dirigé par Worldchefs, a plongé les élèves dans le monde de l’art culinaire tout en soulignant l’importance de la durabilité et de la consommation responsable.

Au cours des sessions interactives, les élèves du CP au CM2 ont été encouragés à assumer leur rôle de “héros de l’alimentation”, en défendant les produits d’origine locale et en luttant contre le gaspillage alimentaire. Ce partenariat entre l’école internationale ICS Paris et Worldchefs témoigne d’un engagement commun à construire un avenir plus durable par l’éducation et l’engagement pratique.

Grâce à cette collaboration, l’école internationale ICS Paris vise à donner aux élèves les moyens de devenir des citoyens du monde consciencieux, dotés des connaissances et des compétences nécessaires pour relever les défis environnementaux les plus pressants. En favorisant les partenariats avec des organisations telles que Worldchefs, l’école s’attache à cultiver une culture de la durabilité et de l’innovation, ouvrant ainsi la voie à un avenir plus brillant et plus vert.

Read the original article from ICS Paris: https://www.icsparis.fr/news-events/news-details/~board/news/post/worldchefs-sustainability-food-hero-workshop


Learn more about Worldchefs’ Feed the Planet programs at www.feedtheplanet.worldchefs.org.

Start your journey towards a more conscious kitchen with Worldchefs’ FREE online Sustainability Education for Culinary Professionals course on Worldchefs Academy! Learn about key topics in food systems at your own pace, and give your career a boost with a valuable digital badge to show you’ve completed the training program.

Feed the Planet is powered by our friends at Electrolux Food Foundation. Visit the Electrolux Food Foundation website here and explore Replate at replate.com.

André Wiringa Start Reverse
Reverse Leadership Strategy
Hospitality Brand Transformation
Customer Experience

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News Member News Industry Trends Blog Company / Partner FeedThePlanet - Blog FeedThePlanet Education

Sustainability Champions at LPU Laguna

Sustainability education is becoming increasingly important as we face new challenges due to the climate crisis. At Lyceum of the Philippines University (LPU) in Laguna, students are not only learning about sustainable practices—they’re also putting their knowledge into action through their participation in Worldchefs’ Feed the Planet programs.
from principles to practice

As part of the Sustainability Education for Culinary Professionals initiative, LPU Laguna students undergo training in sustainable cooking techniques and work with local farmers to source seasonal, organic ingredients. The program has had a significant impact on the students, who have gained a deeper understanding of the importance of sustainable practices in the food industry. They have also developed new culinary skills and techniques that allow them to create delicious and nutritious meals using locally sourced ingredients.

Beyond the students, the benefits are far-reaching. A positive impact on the environment and the local community is clear, too. By sourcing ingredients locally, the program reduces the carbon footprint of the industry and supports local farmers, who are often small-scale and face challenges in accessing markets.

The success of Feed the Planet programs at LPU Laguna is a testament to the power of sustainability education. By providing students with the knowledge and skills to create sustainable food practices, they are not only making a positive impact on the environment, but they are also preparing for careers in the food industry that are increasingly focused on sustainability.

a feed the Planet champion

Chef John Carlo Palacol, a faculty member of LPU, is making waves as a sustainability educator, inspiring students to be responsible stewards of the environment through their love of food. Palacol, a graduate of Culinary Arts and Hotel and Restaurant Management, has been teaching at LPU Laguna since 2015. With his extensive background in the food industry, he has been able to incorporate sustainability principles into his culinary classes, making sure that his and other chef instructors’ students understand the impact of their food choices on the environment.

Chef John Carlo Palacol
Sustainability Education
LPU Laguna
Chef John Carlo Palacol

He’s created a waste management program that teaches aspiring culinarians to sort waste and create nutrient-rich compost, spearheaded LPU Laguna’s Eye for the Green Kitchen program that teaches students how to cook from root-to-stem using locally sourced, seasonal, and organic ingredients and reduces the carbon footprint of the school’s kitchen, and mobilizing the culinary department to develop a sustainable farm, and soon a hyperlocal menus.

Palacol’s efforts in promoting sustainability have not gone unnoticed. This year he was awarded the Worldchefs’ Feed the Planet Champion Level 3 digital badge for his commitment to sustainable culinary practices.

As a sustainability educator, Palacol hopes to inspire his students to become responsible citizens and leaders in their communities. By instilling in them the values of sustainability, he believes that they can make a positive impact on the environment and create a better future for all. Chef John Carlo Palacol is a shining example of how educators can integrate sustainability principles into their teaching, inspiring students to become responsible stewards of the environment. He is a true champion of sustainability and a role model for students and educators alike.


Learn more about Worldchefs’ Feed the Planet programs at www.feedtheplanet.worldchefs.org.

Start your journey towards a more conscious kitchen with Worldchefs’ FREE online Sustainability Education for Culinary Professionals course on Worldchefs Academy! Learn about key topics in food systems at your own pace, and give your career a boost with a valuable digital badge to show you’ve completed the training program.

Feed the Planet is powered by our friends at Electrolux Food Foundation. Visit the Electrolux Food Foundation website here and explore Replate at replate.com.

André Wiringa Start Reverse
Reverse Leadership Strategy
Hospitality Brand Transformation
Customer Experience

Cover image: LPU Laguna CITHM 

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International Chefs Day

Growing Great Chefs: Celebrating International Chefs Day 2023

A message from Vanessa Marquis, CEC AAC, Chairman of Worldchefs International Chefs Day Committee

It warms my heart to hear about International Chefs Day and how chefs worldwide come together to inspire and engage children. It’s truly wonderful to know that Chef Dr. Bill Gallagher’s vision for the day was a great success. I am thankful to everyone who shared his passion with the students, children, and young chefs in their communities. Together, we can make a positive impact on the lives of these children and help them achieve their dreams for a brighter and better future.

The collaboration with Chef Emmanuel Lorieux and Nestlé Professional was instrumental in the success of this year’s campaign, which focused on educating children about sustainability and healthy eating habits. The campaign theme, “Growing Great Chefs,” was well-received by all, and witnessing the joy on everyone’s faces during the events was uplifting.

International Chefs Day is dedicated to Chefs spending time with children, students, and young chefs, teaching them about healthy eating habits, and involving them in cooking and gardening. I am proud to acknowledge my fellow members of Worldchefs for their active participation in these activities. I would like to extend a special thanks to all the chefs and young chefs who contributed to the success of the events.

I would like to express my sincere gratitude to the esteemed Chef Thomas Gugler, President of Worldchefs, the International Chefs Day Committee (Vice Chair-Chef Mathew Shropshall, Chef Ann Brown, Chef Venessa Barnes, and Chef Coo Pillay), and the national office of Worldchefs for their consistent and invaluable support towards this campaign. I share in the excitement for the future and eagerly await the opportunity to witness the true essence of International Chefs Day in October 2024, as captured through the lens of the pictures and videos that will be taken.

Be sure to scroll down to see the results of this year’s participation.

Warm culinary regards,

Vanessa Marquis, CEC AAC
Chairman, International Chefs Day Committee
“Worldchefs, Preparing Children for a Healthy Life”

Photos from Around the Globe

And now what you have all been waiting for…
just look at our final counts for 2023!

Children Reached: 140,750      Chef Participation: 3,680

Thanks to everyone who helped in making this year another success!


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Blog

 Energy saving with commercial refrigerators 

Energy saving with commercial refrigerators 

From counters to cabinets, commercial refrigeration equipment represents nearly a third of the energy used within a professional kitchen. As it is rarely – if ever – switched off, operators could be forgiven for thinking that high running costs are unavoidable. However, when properly specified and regularly maintained, that needn’t be the case.

What is an energy-efficient commercial refrigerator?

The easiest way to determine the energy efficiency of a commercial refrigerator is to look at its energy label. Energy labels were first introduced for commercial catering equipment under the EU Energy Labelling Directive (part of the Ecodesign Directive) in July 2016. Appliances are rated ‘A+++ to G’, with ‘A+++’ being the most efficient class and ‘G’ being the least.

Energy labels for commercial refrigeration equipment also display further key information, such as the total recommended capacity and the annual energy consumption (kWh/annum).

Another helpful performance indicator for operators to be aware of is Climate Class, which illustrates the appliance’s ability to correctly preserve food in different working conditions. Given the typically high temperatures in a professional kitchen, operators should consider commercial refrigeration units built to Climate Class 4 or 5. This will ensure the appliance can operate efficiently, even if the ambient temperature reaches 30- 40°C.

Energy savings with commercial refrigerators

The latest commercial refrigerators and freezers maximise efficient operation thanks to a host of innovative technology.

For example, the Electrolux Professional ecostore Premium range features the Optiflow intelligent air circulation system. This ensures the interior temperature remains consistent, no matter how many times the door is opened or closed.

However, there are a variety of other factors which can impact the efficiency of commercial refrigeration, including the refrigerant gas, the choice of insulation materials and the thickness. Indeed, Electrolux Professional models use the natural R290 refrigerant gas which is both more sustainable than hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants, and less corrosive of the compressor and other core internal parts.

Energy saving tips for a commercial refrigerator

The easiest way to keep energy consumption down is to invest in the most efficient model you can afford. However, there are a few tips and tricks that operators can do to maximise the efficiency of any appliance:

  1. First and foremost, operators should never exceed the storage capacity listed on the energy label. Doing so can limit the airflow around the contents and potentially cause it to spoil earlier. While not strictly linked to utility consumption, food waste is still an expense that should be avoided at all costs. Thanks to its innovative design, the Electrolux Professional ecostoreHP Premium counters range, for example, benefits from an increased 20% capacity compared to other units with a similar footprint.
  2. Secondly, the condenser coil should be cleaned at least every three months to prevent the build-up of dust or debris. Doing so will also stop the appliance from overheating and help it to run as efficiently as possible. Alternatively, operators could opt for models with wire frame condensers, such as the ecostoreHP  Premium series, as they have lower maintenance demands.
  3. Finally, all door seals should be frequently removedcleaned, and checked for leaks. Failing to do so may inadvertently increase power consumption as the unit will have to work even harder to maintain temperature. However, seals are straightforward to replace and keeping on top of regular maintenance will keep any issues at bay.  Electrolux Professional models feature a triple chamber magnetic gasket which can easily be removed and cleaned without impacting the insulation properties of the appliance
Conclusion

While commercial refrigeration may be among the most energy-intensive items in a professional kitchen, there are many ways operators can make savings. From specifying high-efficiency models to engraining regular cleaning and maintenance best practice, refrigeration no longer needs to be a major drain on energy bills.

Save more with Electrolux Professional


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How to Create a Green Commercial Kitchen 

Slash energy bills and make a positive contribution to saving the environment with cutting-edge energy efficient commercial kitchen equipment. 

Rising oil and gas prices have added to the stress of running a commercial kitchen and with companies looking to do their part to tackle climate change, making our kitchens more energy efficient brings business benefits and helps our planet. 

You and your team can take some simple steps straight away to start saving on your energy bills. It starts with explaining key changes that can be made to your team and making sure they’re on board with your energy-saving plan. When it comes to replacing your commercial kitchen equipment, you can make significant savings by investing in new, energy-efficient options, ensuring they pay for themselves in a surprisingly short timeframe. 

Easy energy-saving tips for commercial kitchens

There are some simple changes you can implement right away to become more energy efficient. For example, wear and tear on refrigerator and freezer doors is a common and costly problem that’s often ignored. If the doors don’t close properly, the cooling equipment has to work much harder to keep the contents cold. Replace worn-out door seals and keep them clean. 

Try to ensure natural ventilation as much as possible as when the ambient temperature in your commercial kitchen rises, refrigerators and freezers have to work harder to keep your food chilled. One way is to create areas in your kitchen, one for fridges and another for cookers. 

Look at investing in water-saving devices and taps to reduce excess use and take steps such as ensuring that dishwashers are fully loaded before use. By replacing all lighting with LEDs, you won’t just reduce energy consumption, you’ll also reduce the ambient temperature.

Why upgrading your appliances matters 

Upgrading professional kitchen equipment is a key component of any energy efficiency strategy. Following the initial outlay, you’ll enjoy long-term energy savings and can ensure you also hit your sustainability targets as a company.

Professional kitchen fridges are switched on 24 hours a day, 365 a year to preserve food and keep it fresh, taking up a huge chunk of energy consumption in the kitchen. On top of that, US and EU regulations are becoming increasingly stringent. 

Investing in energy efficient commercial kitchen equipment can save your kitchen thousands of dollars in operational costs and play a role in tackling climate change.

Evolving your kitchen appliances

At Electrolux Professional, they believe in social responsibility and the need to be transparent regarding energy consumption and Electrolux Professional’s equipment’s impact on the environment. All their products are designed and built for the future, with the next generations in mind and are labeled to indicate compliance with energy regulations.

Electrolux Professional always seeks to improve energy efficiency in kitchen appliances, even before regulations came into place. Their R290 high-efficiency HD refrigeration cabinets were already in production in 2011, before energy labels were introduced in 2016. 

A fresh approach to refrigeration

ecostore refrigerators, available in class A, are designed for heavy duty working conditions, guaranteeing more capacity and best in class in energy efficiency. The electricity bill can be cut by 80%* with ecostore refrigerators in class A.

While upgrading your kitchen appliances to more energy-efficient models saves you money in the long run. For example, by switching from a class G to a class B refrigerator, you can save a whopping 78%* of energy costs. And if you switch your freezer from a class G to a class C, you’ll save 70%* on average. 

New refrigeration appliances also help reduce food waste while saving energy by keeping power consumption at a minimum even in the hottest of kitchens. Their devices all use airflow to ensure that temperature and humidity are evenly distributed. 

Designed with the planet in mind, Electrolux Professional ecostore refrigerators use natural gasses such as cyclopentane in the insulation and hydrocarbons, such as R290, which has a very low global warming potential. Hydrocarbons have a less aggressive effect on the refrigerator’s components, meaning that they are less prone to wear and tear and therefore last longer. 

Their insulation system also helps limit energy consumption with a greener and more cost-effective solution. They use 90mm thick stainless steel and cyclopentane gas to keep consistent internal temperatures, cutting energy consumption and compressor activity.

An efficient approach to every appliance

While professional kitchen fridges may be the worst offender efficiency-wise in a kitchen, the cumulative effect of all appliances can send energy bills soaring. Electrolux Professional has worked to ensure all commercial kitchen equipment they develop is as efficient as possible, to help businesses and the planet. 

If you’re looking to upgrade your equipment, consider some of these options for your commercial kitchen.

Cooktops

Choose between our induction cooktops or electric “Ecotop” solid tops to save energy in your kitchen. Our induction cooktops are made to measure and automatically stop energy flow when no pans are detected. This cooking system reduces energy consumption by 60%. Our electric solid tops with the special “Ecotop” coating assure 35% less energy consumption.

Electric grills

Our high-performance electric grills reduce grilling time, saving on energy, and can be kept on minimum while not in use. They then quickly reach high temperatures for grilling thanks to our quick heat technology. Choosing an Electrolux Professional electric grill saves 30% on energy consumption compared to other standard models.

Ovens

Our SkyLine combi oven reduces running time and is designed with the user in mind, with ergonomic features. It relies on a Plan&Save feature that’s based on Artificial Intelligence that optimizes cooking sequences to enable 10% energy savings.

High-speed cooker

The SpeeDelight high-speed cooker uses 60% less energy than regular cookers thanks to its innovative energy-saving mode. It also includes a new feature that puts the unit on standby after a customizable amount of time, helping you to save even more energy. 

Dishwashers

Choose the ‘green&clean’ Rack Type dishwashers to use less water, detergent, electricity, and rinse aid for 34% energy savings. Our single rinse Rack Type guarantees the lowest running costs, which can save you €3,530* a year. It’s also a sustainable choice as you’ll be using 53%* less water, reducing energy consumption by 19%*, and using 53%* less detergent and rinse aid.

*based on internal tests

Final thoughts

With energy prices showing no signs of dropping and a more urgent focus on what we’re doing to help protect our planet, now is the time to make changes in your kitchen. From small everyday changes to investing in energy efficient commercial kitchen equipment, there are many ways to be greener and save business costs.

Save more with Electrolux Professional


BECOME A WORLDCHEFS PARTNER

Partner with Worldchefs to get connected with our international membership of professional associations, hospitality schools, and companies around the globe.

Learn more about our partnership opportunities here.

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